LivingFuel HealthAlerts - 2012 Archive 4


 

August 31, 2012

 

The Medicinal Benefits Of Garlic

 

Nicola Menke

 

Deutsche Presse-Agentur

 

Garlic can ward off vampires, according to an old superstition. Modern science also ascribes protective powers to the pungent bulb -- against health problems.

 

"Garlic was cited as a remedy in ancient Egyptian writings as far back as 1550 BC, and it's regarded to this day as a prophylactic agent and remedy for many illnesses," noted Margret Morlo, a member of Germany's Nutrition and Dietetics Association.

 

Garlic owes its medicinal powers to its components. It contains many vitamins and minerals, including vitamins A, B and C as well as potassium and selenium. It also has a number of beneficial phytochemicals, such as polyphenols and sulfides, and a comparatively high content of adenosine, a biochemical compound important for cell metabolism.

 

Read more about the report here.

 

August 31, 2012

Curcumin May Help Prevent Diabetes

ConsumerLab.com

Past research has suggested a potential role for curcumin (from turmeric) in blood sugar control. A recently published placebo-controlled study of curcumin given daily to people with prediabetes (those with blood sugar levels somewhat higher than normal) produced dramatic results in reducing the percentage of such individuals progressing to diabetes.

Get the details in the latest update to ConsumerLab.com's Turmeric and Curcumin Supplements Review -- which includes quality ratings of products and other potential uses of curcumin.

 

August 30, 2012

Cinnamon Again Linked To Improved Blood Sugar Control For Diabetics

Supplements of a cinnamon extract may help control blood sugar, as well as benefiting triglyceride levels in Chinese people with type-2 diabetes, says a new study.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 30, 2012

The USDA Wants to Protect Us from Raw Almonds

Alliance For Natural Health-USA

The USDA insists that even organic almonds be cooked, but doesn’t want consumers to know they aren’t raw or how they are cooked.

The “pasteurization” rule was introduced in 2007 in response to a string of salmonella outbreaks linked to large almond processing plants in 2001 and 2004; thirty-three people became ill, but no one died. (Contrast that to the thousands of deaths caused by prescription drugs each year!) California’s Almond Board colluded with the USDA to propose mandatory “sterilization” across the industry, and the USDA agreed to implement and enforce the new rule.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 29, 2012

Weight Training Reduces Diabetes Risk

United Press International

Men who do weight training -- 30 minutes per day, five days a week -- may reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes by up to 34 percent, U.S. researchers say.

Lead author Anders Grontved, visiting researcher at the Harvard School of Public Health and a doctoral student in exercise epidemiology at the University of Southern Denmark, said the research also found when weight training was combined with aerobic exercise -- such as brisk walking or running -- diabetes risk was reduced up to 59 percent.

Read more about the research here.

 

August 29, 2012

Wrong Bacteria in Mouth Can Take Heavy Toll on Health

Drs. Kay Judge and Maxine Barish-Wreden

The Sacramento Bee, Calif.

Your mouth is the gateway to your body, and can affect the health of the rest of your body. Did you know that more than 6 billion bacteria are present inside the mouth?

In essence, you have more bacteria in your mouth than the Earth's human population! Most of the bacteria in the mouth are harmless, but the wrong bacteria in your mouth can led to tooth decay, gingivitis, heart disease and kidney disease.

Read more about this report here.

 

August 29, 2012

Resveratrol May Improve Mobility In Older People: Animal Data

The red wine compound resveratrol could help older people to battle against motor deficiencies that lead to mobility problems and increased risks of falls, according to new research in mice

Read more about the research here.

 

August 28, 2012

Omega 3 May Help Curb Inflammation

United Press International

Fish body oils -- omega-3s -- may reduce proteins that cause inflammation, which is linked to heart disease and type 2 diabetes, U.S. researchers say.

Study leader Janice Kiecolt-Glaser of the Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research Ohio State University School of Medicine said study participants, either overweight or obese, were given supplements in different doses, while some got placebos.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 27, 2012

Omega-3s Show Potential To Protect Against Brain Trauma

The potential benefits of omega-3s to reduce the long-term effects of brain trauma may be optimized by early administration, ‘in the emergency department or sooner’, says a new report.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 23, 2012

Anthocyanins May Slash Inflammation Marker Levels: RCT Data

Supplements of anthocyanins – antioxidant pigments from fruit and vegetables – may reduce levels of inflammatory compounds in people with high cholesterol levels, says a new clinical trial from China.

Read more about the research here.

 

August 22, 2012

Green Tea Compound Improves Cardiovascular Profile

Green tea contains between 30 and 40% polyphenols, potent antioxidant compounds; specifically, green tea is abundant in epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Pawel Bogdanski, from Poznan University of Medical Sciences (Poland), and colleagues enrolled 56 obese, hypertensive men and women and assigned each to consume either 379 mg per day of green tea extract (providing 208 mg of EGCG), or placebo, for a three-month period.

Read more about results of the study here.

 

August 22, 2012

Higher Vitamin B1 And B6 Status Linked With Lower Risk Of Dying Over Eight Years

A recent issue of Clinical Nutrition published the finding of researchers from Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes and Monash University in Australia of an association between higher intake of vitamins B1 and B6, as well as higher plasma levels of pyridoxal-phosphate (an indicator of vitamin B6 status), with a lower risk of dying among older men and women during up to ten years of follow-up.

Read more about the research here.

 

August 22, 2012

Hitting Cancer from All Sides

PRNewswire

SANTA ROSA, Calif.

Cancer may be the Harry Houdini of diseases--it often finds devious ways to escape treatment. Because cancer disables our cellular quality control mechanisms, rampant mutations that cause tumor cells to grow uncontrollably can also generate resistance to anticancer drugs. Even if 99 percent of the tumor is destroyed, that 1 percent can come roaring back. How do we knock out that 1 percent? By attacking the cancer from multiple angles, using multiple treatments and strategies.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 21, 2012

Resveratrol Could Help Maintain Senior Mobility

The 244th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society was the site of a presentation about the

"We need to outsmart the cancer before it outsmarts us. To do this, we have to find ways to attack cancer from many angles, so it doesn't have the opportunity to develop protective mutations," says integrative medicine pioneer, Isaac Eliaz, M.D.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 21, 2012

Resveratrol Could Help Maintain Senior Mobility

The 244th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society was the site of a presentation about the discovery of a protective effect for resveratrol, a compound found in red grapes and wine, against the decline in mobility and balance that can occur during aging or with disorders such as Parkinson's disease. According to the American Geriatrics Society, a third of older Americans have balance or mobility challenges, resulting in a greatly increased risk of falls and disability.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 20, 2012

Concerns About Blood Pressure Medications That Promote Sun Sensitivity

Long-Term Use of Blood Pressure Medications that Promote Sun Sensitivity May Increase Risk of Lip Cancer in Non-Hispanic Whites

PRNewswire

Long-term use of commonly used blood pressure medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight is associated with an increased risk of lip cancer in non-Hispanic whites, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

Funded by the National Cancer Institute, the study found that photosensitizing antihypertensive drugs such as nifedipine and hydrochlorothiazide were associated with cancer of the epithelial cells known as squamous cells--which are the main part of the outermost layer of the lips and skin.

Researchers compared 712 patients in Northern California with lip cancer to 22,904 people in a control group and found that the risk of squamous cell lip cancer was higher for those with long-term use of photosensitizing blood pressure medications.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 17, 2012

Nutritional Supplements Reduce Earthquake Stress: New Zealand study

Xinhua News Agency - CEIS

WELLINGTON, (Xinhua) -- Nutritional supplements of vitamins, minerals and other healthy ingredients can help people through the stress of earthquakes and their aftermath, according to a New Zealand study.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 17, 2012

Blood Type May Influence Heart Disease Risk

PrimeNewswire

Study Highlights:

-- Having blood type A, B, or AB was associated with a higher risk for coronary heart disease when compared to those who had blood type O.

-- Genetics determine blood type, but a healthy lifestyle may help protect those with types A, B or AB.

-- The findings were based on two large studies of adults followed for at least 20 years.

< a href=":http://www.lef.org/news/LefDailyNews.htm?NewsID=14490&Section=DISEASE&utm_source=DailyHealthBulletin&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Disease&utm_content=Body+ContinueReading&utm_campaign=DHB_120816">Read more about the study here.

 

August 16, 2012

Low Vitamin D ‘Common’ Among Critically Ill Children, Finds Research

Vitamin D deficiency is very common among children with critical illnesses, and it is associated with worse outcomes, according to new research.

Read more about the research here.

 

August 15, 2012

Low Omega-3 Levels Puts US Service Members At Risk

US Military personal with low omega-3 levels are at a higher risk of reduced cognitive flexibility and executive function, says a new study.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 14, 2012

Increased Vitamins And Iron Linked With Better Physical Fitness During Adolescence

In an article published online in the Journal of Applied Physiology, European researchers report better performance on tests of physical fitness among male and female adolescents who had higher blood levels of several nutrients.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 14, 2012

Concussions May Hasten Brain Aging

United Press International

Concussions and head impacts may hasten the brain's natural aging process, U.S. researchers suggest.

Steven Broglio of the University of Michigan School of Kinesiology and the University of Michigan Health System and colleagues analyzed data of college students with and without a history of concussion, and found changes in gait, balance and in the brain's electrical activity, specifically attention and impulse control.

Researchers asked participants to perform certain tasks at a computer and took images of their brains. The brains of the non-concussed group showed a greater area of electrical activation than those of participants with a history of brain injury.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 13, 2012

Powerful Class Of Antioxidants May Be Potent Parkinson's Treatment

NewsRx.com

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Heart Disease Weekly

A class of antioxidants called synthetic triterpenoids blocked development of Parkinson's in an animal model that develops the disease in a handful of days, said Dr. Bobby Thomas, neuroscientist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Health Sciences University and corresponding author of the study in the journal Antioxidants & Redox Signaling.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 9, 2012

Mixed Vitamin E May Support Blood Vessel Health In Healthy Adults

Short-term supplementation with vitamin E may support the function of cells lining blood cells from potential damage during the increase in blood sugar levels after eating, says a new study.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 9, 2012

“Nutrient Cocktail” Improves Alzheimer-Related Memory Decline

Men and women afflicted by Alzheimer’s Disease display loss of synapses – connections between brain cells, leading to memory loss and other cognitive impairments. Richard Wurtman, from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and colleagues have formulated a mixture of three naturally occurring dietary compounds: choline, uridine and docohexaenoic acid (DHA). The researchers followed 259 patients for six months.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 9, 2012

UK Busts 84 Sports Supplements For “Dangerous Ingredients”

The bad week for the sports nutrition sector continued as the UK medicines regulator announced it had warned retailers and manufacturers to remove 84 products containing “dangerous ingredients”.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 9, 2012

Coenzyme Q10 Plus Selenium Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Deaths In Long Term Trial

A four year trial of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and selenium has revealed a significant reduction in the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease among supplemented men and women. The study, which was reported in an article published online in the International Journal of Cardiology, also uncovered a reduction in the cardiac biomarker N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP, a biomarker of cardiomyocyte wall tension), which is elevated in congestive heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 9, 2012

Sweet Blueberries Big On Flavor And Full Of Health Benefits With Few Calories

Canadian Press

When it comes to nutrition, "good to eat" and "good for you" are not always the same thing. But the two definitely coincide in blueberries.

In the late 1990s, researchers started publishing papers about the health benefits of blueberries, rating them No. 1 in antioxidants out of 40 fresh fruits and vegetables, partly because of anthocyanin, the pigment that gives the fruit its distinctive colour. Besides helping to neutralize elements that can cause cancer and other age-related and degenerative illnesses, the fruit has been credited with anti-inflammatory properties, improved urinary tract function and reduced eyestrain.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 8, 2012

Hyperthermia: Too Hot For Your Health

United Press International

Heat waves cause the most weather-related deaths and the very young, very old and very sick are most at risk, U.S. health officials remind.

"Hyperthermia is an abnormally high body temperature caused by a failure of the heat-regulating mechanisms of the body to deal with the heat coming from the environment," officials at the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health, said in a statement. "Lifestyle factors can include not drinking enough fluids, living in housing without air conditioning, lack of mobility and access to transportation, overdressing, visiting overcrowded places and not understanding how to respond to hot weather conditions."

Read more about the report here.

 

August 8, 2012

Review Backs Nutrition For Cutting Stroke Risk

Increasing dietary intake of fruit and vegetables could help slash the risk of stroke, though more information is needed on how other nutrients and diets can modify risks, says a new review of clinical data.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 8, 2012

There Is 'No Safe Dose Of Radiation' From TSA Naked Body Scanners

(NaturalNews) Besides the fact that they are being operated by an agency that demonstrates on a daily basis a disdain and disregard for discretion, privacy, and professionalism, the Transportation Security Administration's full-body backscatter x-ray machines are just not safe.

That's the diagnosis of Dr. Dong Kim, the neurosurgeon who treated U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., when she was shot in the head in January 2011 by a crazed gunman in Tucson.

"There is really no absolutely safe dose of radiation," said Kim, chair of the department of neurosurgery at the University of Texas Medical School. "Each exposure is additive, and there is no need to incur any extra radiation when there is an alternative."

Read more about the report here.

 

August 7, 2012

Most Ignored Organ That Causes High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is a mysterious condition. If you were to ask a traditional doctor what causes high blood pressure, he/she could come up with many different types of answers.

The real cause of high blood pressure lies in an organ that is hardly ever mentioned in connection to high blood pressure.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 7, 2012

Probiotics Show Anti-Diarrhea Potential In Kids: RCT Data

Daily supplements of probiotic bacterial strain Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 may reduce the frequency and duration of diarrhea for children, says new data from Italy.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 7, 2012

Komen for the Cure Caught In Mammography Propaganda and Fraud?

(NaturalNews) It is time for the truth to be told about Susan G. Komen for the Cure. The organization is, flatly stated, engaged in fraud. Funded by drug companies and mammogram manufacturers, the organization preys upon women in order to grow its own financial power while feeding female victims into the conventional cancer industry grinder.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 6, 2012

Dried Apples May Cut Heart Disease Risk, Study Suggests

Consumption of dried apples may lower the risk of developing cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women by slashing levels of ‘bad’ cholesterol by almost a quarter, according to new research data.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 6, 2012

Blueberries May Lower Cholesterol

High in anthocyanins and flavonols, potent antioxidant compounds, blueberries have been associated with a number of positive health effects. Researchers from The Chinese University of Hong Kong supplemented diets with 0.5% and 1% blueberry anthocyanins, for six weeks, in an animal model.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 3, 2012

Vitamins and dietary supplements: Too much of a good thing? Science would suggest not.

by Alan Ruth, PhD

Earlier this week we ran a story based on a Euromonitor blog that asked some questions of the efficacy, safety and marketing of food supplements. Here Alan Ruth, PhD, CEO of the Irish Health Trade Association responds...

Read more about the report here.

 

August 3, 2012

Health Nuts

In a recent issue of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, a team from Louisiana State University Agricultural Center reports a beneficial effect for tree nuts on reducing a cluster of risk factors collectively known as metabolic syndrome, which is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 3, 2012

High Antioxidant Diet Could Lower Pancreatic Cancer Risk

Research described in an article published online in the journal Gut reveals an association between higher levels of dietary antioxidants and a lower risk of cancer of the pancreas, one of the most deadly forms of cancer.

A team from the University of East Anglia and the University of Cambridge in England evaluated data from 23,658 participants in the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study of men and women residing in Norfolk, England. Seven-day food diaries completed after enrollment provided data concerning the participants' intake of vitamins C and E, selenium and zinc. Blood samples provided by 95 percent of the subjects were analyzed for serum vitamin C levels.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 2, 2012

Sugary Drinks Can Change Muscles In Month

United Press International

Sugary drinks lead to alterations in muscles similar to those in people with obesity problems and type 2 diabetes, researchers in Britain said.

Dr. Hans-Peter Kubis of Bangor University in England said the research showed regularly drinking soft drinks changed the way muscles use food as fuel, making them prefer to burn sugars over fats.

"This study proved our concerns over sugary drinks have been correct. Not only can regular sugar intake acutely change our body metabolism; in fact it seems that our muscles are able to sense the sugars and make our metabolism more inefficient, not only in the present but in the future as well," Kubis said in a statement.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 2, 2012

The Backlash Against Backscatter

ANH

The airport x-ray machines are not safe. And for over a year, TSA has been defying a court order.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 1, 2012

Most Influential Airports in the Spread of an Epidemic

Airports in New York, Los Angeles and Honolulu are judged likeliest to play a significant role in the growth of a pandemic.

Watch a video and read more about the MIT study here.

 

August 1, 2012

Mediterranean Diet Consumed In Middle Age Associated With Reduced Risk of Dying Over 6.8 years Of Follow-up

In an article published online in the Journal of Nutrition, Spanish researchers report a significantly reduced risk of dying over a 6.8 year average follow-up period in association with greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet by middle-aged men and women.

"To our knowledge, our study is the first to report a strong inverse association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and mortality among Mediterranean middle aged adults at low risk of mortality, after controlling for an extensive array of potential confounders," Almudena Sanchez-Villegas of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and colleagues announce.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 1, 2012

Don’t Exclude Berries Because Of Sugar Content’, Say Scandinavian Researchers

Sweetened berries in a healthy diet should not be excluded from a healthy diet since the fiber and polyphenols in the fruit null the glycemic effect, says a new study from Finland.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 31, 2012

ANH: EU Health Claims Legal Action Not Necessary If Trade Groups Had Lobbied Harder

The Alliance for Natural Health International (ANH-Int) has taken a swipe at trade groups in the UK, the Netherlands and elsewhere for their part in the predicament that has led to legal action against the despised European Union nutrition and health claims regulation (NHCR).

Read more about the report here.

 

July 31, 2012

Headache Continues For Hangover Cures Market

Hangover cures in the form of supplements have limited staying power and are being pressed for market space by energy shots and other tonics, according to analysis from Euromonitor International.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 31, 2012

New Study Shows Vitamin D3 Beats D2 For Maintaining Winter Levels

Vitamin D3 is more effective at maintaining blood levels of the sunshine vitamin during winter months than the D2 form, says a new study.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 31, 2012

Integrative Way: Study Indicates Nutrients May Help Memory

The Sacramento Bee

There are currently no good medications available to prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease, but recent studies on dietary interventions to help improve cognition offer significant hope for people suffering from dementia.

Several years ago, Dr. Richard Wurtman at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology developed a mixture of three nutrients that seemed to improve memory in rodents by enhancing the connections of neurons in the brain. These nutrients are DHA, choline, and uridine. DHA is an omega-3 fatty acid found in fatty fish and walnuts, and is the most abundant fatty acid in the brain. Choline is a nutrient that is part of the B vitamin family and is found in eggs, nuts and meats. Uridine is a protein molecule that is harder to obtain from foods, but can be found in sugar beets and broccoli.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 30, 2012

Tai Chi Improves Memory & Thinking Skills

Tai Chi is a Chinese wellness practice that has been previously associated with a variety of physical and mental health benefits. James Mortimer, from the University of South Florida (Florida, USA), with colleagues from Fudan University (China), completed an 8-month randomized controlled trial comparing 120 Chinese seniors who practiced Tai Chi three times a week to a group who did not. The researchers observed that the subjects who practiced Tai Chi experienced increases in brain volume and improvements on tests of memory and thinking, as compared to a group that participated in lively discussions three times per week over the same time period (control group).

Read more about the report here.

 

July 27, 2012

Ways To Avoid Age-Related Eye Diseases

United Press International

People who find they hold a book farther away to read it may just need glasses -- but they may have more serious vision problems, a U.S. eye specialist says.

Dr. Xinzhi Zhang of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said vision, like a lot of things, is less sharp as people age, but there's a difference between normal aging and things going wrong.

"Some vision problems are a normal part of aging, like having trouble reading small print in a newspaper and those can be corrected with glasses," Zhang said in a statement. "However, many serious vision problems are caused by age-related eye diseases."

Read more about the report here.

 

July 26, 2012

Study Unlocks Cholesterol-Lowering Activity Of Blueberry

The potential cardiovascular benefits of blueberry may be related to the berries’ anthocyanins interacting with bile acids to promote cholesterol reduction, suggests data from a study with hamsters.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 26, 2012

Active Brain May Be Best Defense Against Alzheimer's

Xinhua News Agency - CEIS

by Al Campbell

Researchers attending the Alzheimer's Association International Conference have said meditation and education may be able to prevent or reduce the degenerative brain disease.

Researchers from the University of Tasmania said at the conference which concluded on Thursday that there are currently 245,000 Australians living with Alzheimer's disease and it's the country's leading cause of disability in adults over 65.

With the aging of the baby-boomer generation, 1.13 million Australians are forecast to have the disease by 2050, placing a huge strain on the country's healthcare system.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 25, 2012

France Publishes 200,000+Item Nutrient Database

“How many calories does an apple contain? How much protein is found in yogurt? Which fruit contains the most vitamin C, oranges or black currants?”

Learn more about the giant nutrient database here.

 

July 25, 2012

Researchers Recommend Increase In Vitamin C Dietary Allowance

Scientists at Oregon State University's Linus Pauling Institute are proposing an increase in the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin C from the current level of 90 milligrams per day for men and 75 milligrams for women, to a modest intake of 200 milligrams. Writing in a recent issue of Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, Professor Balz Frei and colleagues observe that the current RDA is based on the amount necessary to prevent scurvy and that present methods of evaluating nutrients such as vitamin C have often failed to find further disease-preventive benefits due to faulty methodology. "Phase III randomized controlled trials—designed principally to test the safety and efficacy of pharmaceutical drugs—are ill suited to assess the health benefits of essential nutrients; and the currently available scientific evidence is sufficient to determine the optimum intake of vitamin C in humans," they write.

Read more about the research here.

 

July 24, 2012

Dietary Antioxidants May Help Slash Pancreatic Cancer Risk: EPIC Data

Increasing dietary intake of certain antioxidants could help to cut the risk of developing pancreatic cancer by up to two thirds, according to new research.

Read more about the research here.

 

July 23, 2012

Raisins Help to Steady Blood Sugar Levels

Raisins are high in potassium, have a low glycemic index, and contain fiber, polyphenols, phenolic acid, tannins, and antioxidants. Harold Bays, from the Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Center (L-MARC) (Kentucky, USA), and colleagues recruited 46 men and women, mean age 61 years, who had not been previously been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, but who had mild elevations in glucose levels. Participants were randomly assigned to snack on raisins or pre-packaged commercial snacks that did not contain raisins or other fruits or vegetables, three times a day for 12 weeks.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 19, 2012

'Bugs' Do Battle In Our Bodies

By Liz SzaboUSA TODAY

USA TODAY

There's a war going on, right under our noses, and we're just too blind to see it.

Well, maybe not that blind.

We can see these tiny combatants, all 100 trillion of them, just fine under a microscope.

But they're not always under our nose.

Some of them are in our nose.

And in our mouths. And our intestines. Even in our breast milk and the birth canal.

They're microbes, living on and in the human body, and they outnumber human cells 10-to-1. Collectively, the microbes and their genes have come to be called the microbiome, says Lita Proctor, who leads the National Institute of Health's Human Microbiome Project, which last month released its initial map of a "normal" microbial makeup.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 18, 2012

Review Warns Against Rejecting Potential of Vitamins To Cut Heart Disease Risk

Conclusions from clinical trials that B and E vitamins may be ineffective for reducing the risk of heart disease are inappropriate and the vitamins should not be rejected, says a new review of the evidence.

Read more about the review here.

 

July 18, 2012

Low Vitamin D Level Is Linked To Greater Chance Of Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

NewsRx.com

A new study presents more evidence of a possible link between low vitamin D levels and a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

The study found an inverse relationship between the level of vitamin D in the blood and the presence of the metabolic syndrome, which is a group of risk factors that increases the risk of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. People with the highest blood levels of vitamin D had a 48 percent lower risk of having the metabolic syndrome than did those with the lowest vitamin D levels, the authors reported.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 17, 2012

Higher Selenium Levels Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk: Harvard Study

Increased levels of selenium in the body may be associated with a 25% reduction in the risk of type-2 diabetes, says a new study from Korea and Harvard.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 17, 2012

Treating Vitamin D Deficiency May Improve Depression

NewsRx.com

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Diabetes Week

Women with moderate to severe depression had substantial improvement in their symptoms of depression after they received treatment for their vitamin D deficiency, a new study finds.

Because the women did not change their antidepressant medications or other environmental factors that relate to depression, the authors concluded that correction of the patients' underlying shortage of vitamin D might be responsible for the beneficial effect on depression.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 17, 2012

Grape Compound Enhances Exercise Performance

Resveratrol is an antioxidant compound found abundantly in red grapes and red wine, for which a number of cardiovascular and cognitive health benefits have been suggested. Jason R. B. Dyck, from the University of Alberta (Canada), and colleagues have observed that high doses of the resveratrol improve physical performance, heart function and muscle strength in lab models.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 16, 2012

Prebiotics May Enhance Magnesium Uptake From Diet: Rat Data

Prebiotic fibers may enhance the absorption and retention in rats, suggests new data from Purdue University with implications for bone health in postmenopausal women.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 14, 2012

Updated: Associations welcome Durbin-Blumenthal cGMP dialogue & FDA explains GMP viol

The Natural Products Association (NPA) and the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) have welcomed requests from Senators Durbin and Blumenthal to outline cGMP education initiatives, but questions have been raised as to the numbers cited by FDA officials regarding GMP violations.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 13, 2012

Iron Supplementation Reduces Fatigue In Premenopausal Women

The results of a trial described online in the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) reveal a significant benefit for iron supplements in iron-deficient (but nonanemic) premenopausal women who experienced fatigue. Reduced iron levels are common among women of childbearing age; however, consuming too much iron increases free radical damage, which has been linked to a number of diseases.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 13, 2012

Root Of Fatigue Can Stem From Many Sources

Sarah Lundgren, The Brunswick News, Ga.
Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News

Sometimes feeling tired and run down can be more than just not getting enough sleep. It could be fatigue.

"Medication for hypertension and any drug or alcohol abuse can cause fatigue," James Snow, an emergency medicine physician at St. Simons Island Immediate Care Center, said.

"Low testosterone or low female hormones, emotional stress, poor diet, lack of exercise, sleep disorders and chronic sinus infections can also cause fatigue," Snow said.

Some medical conditions that can cause constant fatigue are heart or lung disease, endocrinology problems, rheumatoid arthritis, Addison's disease, fibromyalgia, chronic viral syndrome and depression.

For people with any of these health problems, it might feel difficult to escape tiredness. However, there are some ways to combat it.

Read more about the report here.

 

 

July 12, 2012

Vitamin B6 and B12 Levels Linked To Mental Function And Depression

Low levels of vitamins B6 and B12 are associated with an increased risk of impaired cognition, says a new study that adds support to links between B vitamin intake and cognitive function.

Read more about the study here.

 

 

July 11, 2012

Dietary Magnesium May Halve Cardiovascular Mortality

Data from a long-term study of nearly 60,000 people suggests that increasing the amount of magnesium in the diet could cut the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease by as much as 50%. Wen Zhang, from Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, and colleagues from several Japanese Universities, used data from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study, involving 58,615 healthy Japanese people aged between 40 and 79. A total of 2,690 participants died from cardiovascular disease over the course of the 15-year-long study.

Read more about the study here.

 

 

July 11, 2012

Omega-3’s Anti-inflammatory Potential Shows In Overweight People

Supplements of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce levels of certain inflammatory markers by 10%, says a new study that claims to be the first to show omega-3 supplementation may alter inflammatory markers in overweight but otherwise healthy people.

Read more about the study here.

 

 

July 10, 2012

Fruit Phenols May Have Metabolic Syndrome Benefits

Phenolic compounds found in stone fruits could act as a synergistic ‘weapon’ against metabolic syndrome, according to new research.

Read more about the research here.

 

July 10, 2012

Calorie Restriction, Exercise Rejuvenate Nerve Connections

An article published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals a mechanism for exercise and calorie restriction in delaying some of the effects of aging.

In their introduction, Joshua R. Sanes and his Harvard University colleagues explain that "The cellular basis of age-related behavioral decline remains obscure but alterations in synapses are likely candidates. Accordingly, the beneficial effects on neural function of caloric restriction and exercise, which are among the most effective anti-aging treatments known, might also be mediated by synapses."

Read more about the report here.

 

July 9, 2012

Exercise May Be Needed For Dietary Restriction Benefits

In a recent issue of the journal Cell Metabolism, scientists at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging report the outcome of experiments that suggest that it may be necessary to be physically active in order to derive maximum benefit from dietary restriction (DR). Significant restriction of the intake of a particular nutrient or total calories has extended the life span of numerous species in laboratory experiments; however, researchers are still clarifying the mechanisms involved in the technique.

Read more about the research here.

 

 

July 7, 2012

Long-term Use of Drugs to Remedy Heartburn Can Lead to Complications

RONI CARYN RABIN
International Herald Tribune

Long-term use of drugs to remedy heartburn can lead to complications.

The first time Jolene Rudell fainted, she assumed that stress as a medical school student had gotten to her. Then, two weeks later, she lost consciousness again.

Blood tests showed Ms. Rudell's red blood cell count and iron level were dangerously low. But she is a hearty eater (and a carnivore), and her physician pointed to another culprit: a popular drug used by millions of Americans like Ms. Rudell to prevent gastroesophageal acid reflux, or severe heartburn.

Long term use of the drugs, called proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, can make it difficult to absorb some nutrients. Ms. Rudell, 33, has been taking these medications on and off for nearly a decade. Her doctor treated her anemia with high doses of iron, and recommended she try to manage without a PPI, but that's been difficult, she said.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 6, 2012

Longer Sleep Duration Inhibits Genetic Factors Promoting Weight Gain

A new study examining the relationship between sleep duration and body mass index (BMI), suggests that getting plenty of sleep each night may help to suppress certain genetic factors that promote weight gain. Nathaniel Watson, of the University of Washington, and colleagues collected data on height, weight, and sleep habits from 1,088 pairs of twins. Results showed that genetic influences accounted for 70% of differences in BMI in twins that slept for seven hours or less each night, compared with just 32% in those that slept for nine hours or more each night.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 6, 2012

Poor Survival Among African-American Cancer Patients Could Be Explained By Low D

The authors of a review published in the journal Dermato-Endocrinology suggest that decreased production of vitamin D by African Americans may be a reason for their higher rates of cancer mortality in comparison with Caucasians.

William B. Grant of the Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center in San Francisco and Alan N. Peiris of Mountain Home Veterans Administration Medical Center and East Tennessee State University write that various factors have been suggested to explain African Americans' increased likeliness of dying from a variety of cancers, including cancer stage at time of diagnosis, socioeconomic status and differences in treatment.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 5, 2012

Artificial Lighting Poses Health Risks, American Medical Association Asserts

William Weir

The Hartford Courant, Connecticut

The American Medical Association recently adopted recommendations based on a report co-authored by a University of Connecticut researcher asserting that certain types of nighttime lighting can adversely affect health and may be linked to breast cancer and other medical conditions.

The AMA's house of delegates voted to adopt policies based on the report "Light Pollution: Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting," co-authored by Richard Stevens, an epidemiologist at the University of Connecticut Health Center. He was one of four writers.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 4, 2012

Reduced DHEA Levels In Men Associated With Greater Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease

The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting held in Houston last week was the site of a presentation of the finding of a protective effect for higher levels of the steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) against the risk of cardiovascular events in men. DHEA, produced by the adrenal glands, acts a precursor to the hormones estradiol and testosterone. While some research findings have suggested an association between increased DHEA levels and a reduction in heart disease, the majority of the studies involving DHEA have been small and results have not always been conclusive.

Read more about the report here.

 

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