LivingFuel HealthAlerts - 2012 Archive 3


 

June 22, 2012

Chewing Gum May Impair Short-Term Memory

Previous studies have suggested that chewing gum was helpful in improving memory recall. However, results of a recent set of experiments by Michail Kozlov and colleagues at Cardiff University (UK) suggest that this is not the case, and that chewing gum actually impairs short-term memory. The researchers conducted three experiments to investigate the impact of chewing gum on short-term memory. For the first, 40 students were asked to vigorously chew flavorless gum and remember a sequence of seven randomly ordered letters. A smaller sample group were then asked to repeat the experiment but chew naturally.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 22, 2012

Folate During Pregnancy May Benefit Offspring’s Emotions: Study

Low levels of folic acid during pregnancy may increase emotional health problems in children, says a new study.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 22, 2012

Resveratrol Could Enhance Exercise Performance

Intake of the red wine polyphenol resveratrol could help boost exercise performance by improving strength and endurance, according to new research in rats.

Read more about the research here.

 

June 21, 2012

Vitamin D, Herbs Can Help Manage Symptoms of Lupus

SUZY COHEN Dear Pharmacist
Tulsa World

Dear Pharmacist: I have Lupus, and I've been on medicine for 22 years. My symptoms are not well controlled, and I have lost ability to live life due to all the daily complications. Please offer advice to help me regain quality of life, while I am still breathing on this Earth. - J.S., Dayton, Ohio

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) or "lupus" currently affects an estimated 1.5 million Americans and 90 percent of those afflicted are women. Lupus is an autoimmune disease, meaning the body's immune system attacks itself. Symptoms can vary tremendously.

Read the rest of the report here.

 

June 21, 2012

EWG's 2012 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce

Read EWG's 2012 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce and watch KC and Monica share how to pick healthy fruits and vegetables.

 

June 20, 2012

Vaccinated Children Have Up To 500% More Disease Than Unvaccinated Children

By PF Lewis

(NaturalNews) Suspicions have been confirmed for those wary of vaccinating their children. A recent large study corroborates other independent study surveys comparing unvaccinated children to vaccinated children.

They all show that vaccinated children have two to five times more childhood diseases, illnesses, and allergies than unvaccinated children.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 20, 2012

Nuts Essential to Health of Brain And Body

Julie Bodenmann PSYCHOLOGY TODAY MAGAZINE
Buffalo News

They're among the earliest known foods. Archaeological evidence suggests that tree nuts were a major part of the human diet 780,000 years ago. Several varieties of nuts, along with the stone tools necessary to crack them open, have been found buried deep in bogs in the Middle East. Rich in energy and loaded with nutrients, nuts and, particularly, their cargo of omega-3 fatty acids are thought to have been essential to the evolution of the large, complex human brain.

Read more about the report here.

 

June 19, 2012

Supplementing with Calcium and Vitamin D Associated with Lower Risk of Dying

An article published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism reveals the outcome of a pooled analysis of eight randomized controlled trials which suggests that the use of calcium and vitamin D supplements reduced mortality over an average three year period.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 19, 2012

Melatonin, A Natural Programmed Cell Death Inducer in Cancer

New study by the Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, Spain, shows that in relation to its oncostatic properties, there is evidence that tumor initiation, promotion or progression may be restrained by the night-time physiological surge of melatonin in the blood or extracellular fluid.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 18, 2012

Study Faults Research Linking Hormone Therapy To Cancer

Agence France-Presse

A landmark investigation which found that hormone treatment for the menopause boosts the risk of breast cancer is riddled with flaws, a new study published on Monday alleges.

The so-called Million Women Study (MWS) unleashed headlines when it was first published in 2003.

Based on questionnaires returned by more than a million post-menopausal women in Britain, it said hormone replacement therapy (HRT) led to a rise in breast-cancer incidence.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 18, 2012

Load-Bearing Exercise Benefits Men’s Bone Health

Osteoporosis affects more than 200 million people worldwide, being more common in women, but men also develop it—usually after age 65. Without intervention, 1 in 5 men develop fractures relating to osteoporosis in older age. Mattias Lorentzon, from the University of Gothenburg (Sweden), and colleagues evaluated 833 men who were 18- to 20-years old at the start of the study. The researchers measured the participants' bone mass and collected information about their exercise habits. Five years later the recruits came back to the lab to report activity levels and get bone scans again.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 15, 2012

Body Clock Linked to Weight Gain

 

Many of the biological processes of the human body operate on a clock-like mechanism, known as a circadian rhythm, with an endogenous duration of approximately 24 hours. Previous research has identified a gene responsible for our internal body clocks, called Rev-Erb alpha. Etienne Challet, from the University of Strasbourg (France), and colleagues studied two groups of mice.

 

Read more about the study here.

 

June 14, 2012

How To Raise HDL Naturally By Dr. William Davis

 

We achieve greater control over heart disease risk by adhering to a formula called the "Rule of 60": LDL 60 mg/dl, HDL 60 mg/dl, triglycerides 60 mg/dl, or 60:60:60., relying on as little medication as possible.

 

Read more about the report here.

 

June 13, 2012

What’s the Fuss About GMO?

 

by Jodi Knapp

 

When I first heard people complaining about Genetically Modified Organisms or Food, I have to admit that I wasn’t quite sure what the problem was.

 

After all, we’ve been breeding animals as well as plants that better suited our needs for hundreds of years. Is there really any more danger with playing directly with the genes a little?

 

Quickly, however, when I began studying the subject a little better, I realized this was maybe the most dangerous step human race had ever taken. Not only may it be contributing to some of the major diseases of modern day, it might end up wiping out every human on earth.

 

Read more about the report here.

 

June 13, 2012

Saffron Extract Proving to Have Profound Effects on Weight Loss

 

NewsRx.com

 

It's a phenomenon that as modern science progresses, mother nature is consistently found to produce some of the healthiest and most effective chemical compounds available. Turns out this new finding shows that one of the promising and powerful chemical may have been in our kitchen all along. Researchers have recently found in a weight loss study that the participant had a significant improvement in weight loss due to taking an extract derived from the commonly known spice, Saffron.

 

Read more about the report here.

 

June 12, 2012

Lack Of Fiber Puts Teens At Risk Of Diabetes, Study Says

 

Tom Corwin

The Augusta Chronicle, Ga.

 

Amid a table full of trays stacked with tortilla chips at Moe's Southwest Grill in Augusta, Shelby Kenrick proudly holds up a bag of apple slices. The 17-year-old from North Augusta is also the rare teen who thinks about fiber.

 

"That's what I eat for breakfast," she said, in the form of fiber bars.

 

Not many teens in Augusta are following her example, and it could have serious health consequences, said researchers at the Georgia Prevention Institute at Georgia Health Sciences University.

 

Read about the study here.

 

June 11, 2012

Integrative Medicine: Antioxidants And Chemotherapy

Drs. Kay Judge and Maxine Barish-Wreden
The Sacramento Bee, Calif.

Inflammation, and the use of antioxidants to put out inflammatory fires, is a hot topic these days. What do we mean by inflammation?

Inflammation is a natural and necessary response in the body whenever we are accosted by harmful germs or when we injure ourselves. When this occurs, our immune system steps in to fight foreign invaders and to bring our body back into balance so that we can heal.

Read more about the report here.

 

June 8, 2012

CDC Issues Major Vaccine Alert

WASHINGTON

(Reuters) - Free vaccines meant for children as part of a U.S. government program may have been stored at the wrong temperature, which could make them less effective, according to a report released on Wednesday.

Read more about the report here.

 

June 8, 2012

Black Pepper as Fat Fighter

 

A number of previous studies have suggested that black pepper may help to fight fat. Korean researchers have elucidated the biological mechanism by which piperine — the pungent-tasting compound that gives black pepper its characteristic taste – blocks the formation of new fat cells. Soo-Jong Um, from Sejong University (Korea), and colleagues completed laboratory studies and conducted computer modeling, finding that piperine interferes with the activity of genes that control the formation of new fat cells.

 

Read more about the study here.

 

June 7, 2012

Probiotic-Prebiotic Combination May Ease Eczema In Kids: Study

Combining probiotics and prebiotics to produce a symbiotic may reduce the severity of eczema in children, suggests new research from Taiwan with 60 children.

Read more about the study here.
 

June 6, 2012

Vitamin D Rejuvenates Aging Eyes In Laboratory Study

An article published online in the journal Neurobiology of Aging reports an eye-rejuvenating benefit for a short course of vitamin D supplementation in aged mice.

Professor Glen Jeffery and his associates at the Institute of Ophthalmology at University College London supplemented old mice with vitamin D3 for six weeks while an untreated group served as controls. In addition to improved vision, the team found a reduction in number and changes in the configuration of retinal macrophages—immune cells that can sometimes cause excessive inflammatory damage—in animals that received the vitamin, as well as a decrease in retinal amyloid beta accumulation, which is a marker of aging. In humans, inflammation and amyloid beta accumulation are associated with an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 6, 2012

Protein-Rich Diet Can Change Food Preferences

Craving a steak for dinner? According to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition this may be a symptom of a low protein diet.

Read more about the study here.
 

June 6, 2012

Multi-biomarker Approach Demonstrates Flavanol Cardio Benefits: Study

An eight-week study of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOPs) employing a multi-biomarker approach” in a healthy population of smokers has shown cardiovascular benefits.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 5, 2012

Increased fiber Intake Associated With Lower Risk Of Dying Over Twelve Year Period

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published an article online recently which revealed the finding of an international team of researchers of a reduction in mortality during 12.7 years of follow-up among men and women who consumed higher amounts of fiber. The study included 452,717 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a prospective cohort study of different dietary patterns across ten European countries. The average age upon enrollment was 50.8 years. Questionnaires concerning diet, physical activity and other lifestyle factors completed upon recruitment were analyzed for total fiber intake (for which bread, vegetables and fruit were the most common sources). Over an average follow-up period of 12.7 years, 23,582 deaths occurred.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 5, 2012

The Hidden Health Epidemic

PrimeNewswire

An epidemic of misdiagnoses are killing and crippling people, according to physician Jeffery Stuart and Sally Pacholok, R.N., mostly because the real, easily correctable problem imitates a variety of terminal diseases, then turns lethal itself when ignored: vitamin B-12 deficiency.

Millions of people needlessly suffer and even die from this common vitamin deficiency. Doctors mistakenly think their patients have multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's, autism, anemia, depression, chronic fatigue, or some other disease or condition mimicked by B-12 deficiency.

Read more about the report here.

 

June 5, 2012

High Cholesterol Linked to Psoriasis

84% of people with the inflammatory skin condition known as psoriasis have advanced heart disease –significantly higher than those without psoriasis, according to a study published in the American Journal of Cardiology.

Read more about the study here.

 

June 4, 2012

Are You Getting the Right Vitamin B12?

Vitamin B12 is a water soluable vitamin your body needs to manufacture fresh blood cells and to maintain a healthy nervous system. A B12 deficiency can lead to debilitating anemia, a host of neurological issues and overall lethargy and lack of energy.

Read more about the report here.

 

June 4, 2012

Benefits of Fiber


Gastroenterologist Dr. Robynne Chutkan gives a highly information presentation about fiber and its many benefits. You'll learn about the types of fiber, how fiber can help with conditions ranging from heart disease to constipation, and important tips on how to best use fiber supplements.

Click here for the audio presentation.

 

June 2, 2012

High Dose Omega-3 May Benefit Early Communicative Development


A fish oil supplement enriched with DHA may benefit early communicative development in infants, says the first randomized controlled trial testing high dose omega-3 on brain development in non-premature infants.

Read more about the report here.

 

June 1, 2012

 

Berries Help to Preserve Memory

 

Berries such as blueberries and strawberries are high in anthocyanidins, a type of flavonoid antioxidant, which has been shown in previous studies to improve cognition. Elizabeth E. Devore, from Brigham and Women's Hospital (Massachusetts, USA), and colleagues analyzed data collected in the Nurses' Health Study—involving 121,700 female, registered nurses between the ages of 30 and 55 years —who completed health and lifestyle questionnaires beginning in 1976.

 

Read more about the study here.

 

May 31, 2012

Common Environmental Bacteria May Spur Allergic Inflammation

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common bacterium found in soil, water, skin flora, and most man-made environments throughout the world. University of California/San Francisco (UCSF; California, USA) researchers have established an eye-opening connection between this common environmental bacteria and airway inflammation. George Caughey and colleagues studied the effect of specific strains of Pseudomonas bacteria in a laboratory model of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell).

Read more about the research here.

May 31, 2012

Vitamin D Helps Relieve Menstrual Symptoms

A research letter published in the American Medical Association journal Archives of Internal Medicine reported the results of a study of women with primary dysmenorrhea which found that a single high dose of oral vitamin D3 reduced pain over a two month period. Dysmenorrhea is characterized by painful uterine cramping which is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and other symptoms. The condition affects at least half of premenopausal girls and women, and can have a major impact on work and school attendance and performance.

Read more about the research here.

 

May 30, 2012

Testing Olive Oil

(NaturalNews) As much as 50 percent of the olive oil sold in the U.S. is not actually pure olive oil, as some brands claiming to be "extra-virgin" or "100 percent Italian," for instance, have actually been adulterated with toxic rapeseed oil, more popularly known as canola oil, soybean oil, and other low-grade oils. In his new book Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil, olive oil expert Tom Mueller explains that not all olive oil is the same, and offers advice on how to spot authentic olive oil amidst all the imposters.

 

May 30, 2012

Mitochondrial Dysfunction Present Early in Alzheimer's, Before Memory Loss

Business Wire

Mitochondria - subunits inside cells that produce energy - have long been thought to play a role in Alzheimer's disease. Now Mayo Clinic researchers using genetic mouse models have discovered that mitochondria in the brain are dysfunctional early in the disease. The findings appear in the journal PLoS ONE.

The group looked at mitochondria in three mouse models, each using a different gene shown to cause familial, or early-onset, Alzheimer's disease. The specific mitochondria changes corresponded with the mutation type and included altered mitochondrial movement, structure, and energy dynamics. The changes happened in the brain even before the mice showed any symptoms such as memory loss. The group also found that the mitochondrial changes contributed to the later loss of mitochondrial function and the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 29, 2012

Curcumin Helps Improve Immune Function

In an article published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, researchers from Oregon State University (OSU) report a benefit for curcumin, a compound found in the spice turmeric, in innate immune function.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 29, 2012

Curcumin May Have Parkinson's Promise: Study

Intake of the tumeric spice curcumin could help to reduce clumping of proteins associated with the onset of Parkinson’s disease, according to new research.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 28, 2012

What the New Sunscreen Labels Really Mean

If you’re like most Americans, you think that the best way to prevent skin cancer is to put on sunscreen—and the higher the product’s sun protection factor (SPF), the better. But both of these beliefs are false.

Shade and/or protective clothing provide better protection than sunscreen, and a super-high SPF doesn’t necessarily work better than a lower-SPF product. Misconceptions about how protective sunscreens are can be dangerous because they lead people to spend too much time in the sun and increase their risk for skin cancer.

Read more about the report here.

 

May 25, 2012

Increased Vitamin D Intake Linked With Lower Stroke Risk Over 34 Years Of Follow-up

An article published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke reports a protective effect for greater vitamin D intake against the risk of ischemic stroke in Japanese-American men. To the authors' knowledge, there has only been one other longitudinal cohort study (which had fewer subjects and a shorter follow-up) that evaluated dietary vitamin D intake and stroke risk.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 25, 2012

The Life-Extending Role of Vitamin D

Previously, vitamin D deficiency has been linked to osteoporosis, fractures, autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and cardiovascular disease. Additionally, growing evidence suggests that vitamin D may reduce the incidence of several types of cancer as well as diabetes. James L. Vacek, from the University of Kansas (Kansas, USA), and colleagues studied how vitamin D levels and supplementation may affect disease risk and mortality in 10,899 men and women, average age 58 years.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 24, 2012

Chemical Damage Can Be Inherited By Offspring Through Unlimited Generations

(NaturalNews) Groundbreaking new science reveals that the harmful effects of exposure to synthetic chemicals are passed from generation to generation via "epigenetics," causing measurable damage to future generations even if those offspring are never exposed to the original chemical. The phenomenon of "Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance" (ETI) has now been demonstrated in live animals, and if the implications of this research are fully understood, it would force human civilization to radically rethink its widespread use of synthetic chemicals in agriculture, medicine, food, construction materials, personal care products and elsewhere.

 

May 24, 2012

New Therapies for Cancer & Diabetes Reported at A4M Spring 2012 Congress

Observes Dr. Ronald Klatz, A4M President: “Historically, the physicians and scientists involved in anti-aging science have been the first to embrace innovative medical discoveries and technological advancements that have subsequently been mainstreamed. At the A4M World Congresses held continuously since 1993, over 100,000 physicians, health practitioners, and scientists have been among the first to learn of revolutionary life-enhancing, life-extending discoveries such as: the hormone melatonin as a cancer-fighting agent, the identification of homocysteine as a marker for heart disease, the role of Vitamin D beyond bone health, and more.” Dr. Robert Goldman, A4M Chairman, adds: “The American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M) enters its third decade of educational service, and we celebrate the pioneering achievements of the anti-aging scientific movement. Tomorrow’s medicine is here today, and we commend Congress delegates for their foresight in attending in this world-renowned scientific program. ”

Read more about the A4M Spring 2012 Congress here.

 

May 23, 2012

High Fiber Diet Shows Cardioprotective Benefit In Women

An article published online in the journal PLoS One revealed a protective effect for fiber against ischemic cardiovascular disease in women.

Peter Wallström of Lund University and his associates evaluated data from 8,139 men and 12,535 women aged 44 to 73 years who participated in the Swedish population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort, which enrolled residents of Malmö, Sweden between 1991 and 1996. Interview responses and seven-day dietary records were analyzed for the intake of energy, fats, fiber, carbohydrates and other macronutrients. Participants were followed for an average of 13.5 years, during which 1,089 men and 687 women developed ischemic cardiovascular disease.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 23, 2012

Probiotics Help Prevent Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

A review and meta-analysis reported in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association found a protective effect for orally-administered probiotics against diarrhea that often develops as a response to antibiotic drugs. While antibiotics destroy harmful as well as beneficial bacteria, probiotics consist of beneficial live microorganisms whose presence in the digestive tract can help prevent the overgrowth of unhealthy organisms.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 23, 2012

Men Who do Load-bearing Exercise In Early 20s May Be Shielded From Osteoporosis

NewsRx.com

Young men who play volleyball, basketball or other load-bearing sports for four hours a week or more increase bone mass and might gain protection from developing osteoporosis later in life, according to a new study in the May issue of the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

The study, the largest scale investigation of its kind, discovered that young men who actively resisted the urge to adopt a "couch-potato" lifestyle in their late twenties seemed to gain the biggest bone benefit. "Men who increased their load-bearing activity from age 19 to 24 not only developed more bone, but also had larger bones compared to men who were sedentary during the same period," said senior study author Mattias Lorentzon, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Gothenburg, in Sweden.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 22, 2012

If The Food’s In Plastic, What’s In The Food?

Washington Post

The issue is complicated by questions about cumulative exposure, as Americans come into contact with multiple chemical-leaching products every day. Those questions are still unresolved, says Linda Birnbaum, director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Science, part of the National Institutes of Health. Still, she said, “we do know that if chemicals act by the same pathway that they will act in an additive manner” — meaning that a variety of chemicals ingested separately in very small doses may act on certain organ systems or tissues as if they were a single cumulative dose.

Read more about the report here.

 

May 21, 2012

Pre and Probiotics In Formula Could Boost Infant Immunity

The addition of pre and probiotics to infant formula could help to boost immune responses by colonising newborn babies’ guts with a stable population of beneficial bacteria, say researchers.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 21, 2012

Root Crops Stabilize Cholesterol

Posted by Scott Davis

A new study conducted by the Department of Science and Technology’s Food and Nutrition Research Institute reveals incredible benefit of root crops.

The fiber in root crops such as camote, or sweet potatoes, can send bad cholesterol levels plummeting, according to the study on subjects with moderately high cholesterol.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 19, 2012

Drink Water With Meals To Avoid Obesity, Diabetes And Other Ills

Katy Muldoon
The Oregonian, Portland, Ore.

Drinking water with meals could be one of the easiest ways to avoid obesity and its accompanying ills, according to new research published online this week in the journal Appetite.

T. Bettina Cornwell of University of Oregon and Anna R. McAlister of Michigan State University detailed two studies in their paper. In one, researchers repeatedly watched 75 preschoolers as they were served drinks alongside raw vegetables. They found that the children, age 3 to 5, ate more vegetables when they were accompanied by water than when they were served with sweetened beverages.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 18, 2012

Sitting A Lot Raises Women's Diabetes Risk

United Press International

Women who sit for long periods daily are more prone to developing type 2 diabetes, but a similar link wasn't found in men, British researchers say.

Dr. Thomas Yates of University of Leicester found women who were sedentary for most of the day are at greater risk of exhibiting the early metabolic defects that act as a precursor to developing type 2 diabetes than people who tend to sit less.

The team assessed more than 500 men and women of the age of 40 or more about the amount of time spent sitting over the course of a week, helped out by tests on the level of specific chemicals in their bloodstream that are linked to diabetes and metabolic dysfunction.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 18, 2012

Omega-3s Promote Brain Health

Previously, a number of studies have suggested that dietary supplementation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids exert a number of cardiovascular and circulatory benefits. David O. Kennedy, from Northumbria University (United Kingdom), and colleagues studied 65 healthy adults, ages 18 to 29 years. Each subject was given either a supplement of docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil (1 g or 2 g) or placebo (olive oil), for a 12-week long period.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 17, 2012

Diet Rich In High-Fructose Corn Syrup May Make You Forgetful

By Nancy Dillon
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

The brain freeze from that hot fudge sundae might last longer than you think.

A new UCLA study on rats is the first to show how a diet high in processed sugar slows the brain, hampering memory and learning.

"Our findings illustrate that what you eat affects how you think," study author Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, a professor of neurosurgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, said. "Eating a high-fructose diet over the long term alters your brain's ability to learn and remember information."

Read more about the study here.

 

May 16, 2012

Music Training Improves The Aging Process, Researchers Say

Harry Jackson Jr.
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

EVANSTON, Ill. -- Music training has a lifelong good impact on the aging process, says a new study out of Northwestern University.

Researchers in the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern measured the automatic brain responses of younger and older musicians and non-musicians to speech sounds. Researchers discovered that older musicians had a distinct neural timing advantage. Researchers concluded that age-related delays in neural timing are not inevitable and can be avoided or offset with musical training.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 15, 2012

Vitamin D Supplements May Help You Live Longer

Vitamin D supplements may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and boost survival for older people, suggests a new analysis.

Read more here.

 

May 15, 2012

Science Journal Estimates Half Of All Cancers Are Preventable

Imagine a world where half the cases of cancer that now exist are suddenly nonexistent.

According to a review published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the idea is not at all far-fetched.

Graham A. Colditz, MD, DrPH and coauthors K. Y. Wolin and Sarah J. Gehlert of the Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University in St Louis conclude that we now have the knowledge to bring about wide scale prevention of a disease estimated to kill 577,190 men and women this year in the United States alone. "We actually have an enormous amount of data about the causes and preventability of cancer," stated Dr Colditz, who is the Siteman Cancer Center's associate director of prevention and control. "It's time we made an investment in implementing what we know."

Read more about the study here.

 

May 14, 2012

Pioneering Study Shows Prenatal Choline May 'Program' Healthier Babies

NewsRx.com

ITHACA, N.Y. - Pregnant women may have added incentive to bulk up on broccoli and eggs now that a Cornell University study has found increased maternal intake of the nutrient choline could decrease their children's chances of developing hypertension and diabetes later in life (see also Cornell University).

Read more about the study here.

 

May 14, 2012

Reasons Your Diet Isn't Working

Mclatchy-Tribune News Service.

2. YOU REWARD YOURSELF WITH FOOD AFTER EXERCISE: Burning 300 calories during a workout is cause for celebration...but rewarding yourself with a high-calorie treat doesn't add up to weight loss. You're likely to overestimate how much the workout burned off and underestimate how much you ate. "Even if you're just working out for well-being, you still have to keep calories in check," says Heidi Skolnik, author of "Nutrient Timing for Peak Performance."

Read more reasons why your diet isn't working here.

 

May 12, 2012

Walnuts & Other Nuts Improve Markers of Chronic Disease

Walnuts, almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, and pistachios are types of tree nuts, for which a number of previous studies have suggested a variety of health benefits. Carol O’Neil, from Louisiana State University Agricultural Center (Louisiana, USA), and colleagues reviewed data collected on 13,292 men and women, ages 19 years and up, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) 1999 – 2004. The team surveyed subjects for on dietary intake – including tree nuts, and correlated the data against factors involved in chronic diseases.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 11, 2012

Vitamin D May Reduce Stress Fracture Risk In Girls

Increased intakes of vitamin D may reduce the risk of stress fracture in adolescent girls, says a new study that adds to the potential health benefits of the sunshine vitamin.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 10, 2012

Has Your Food Gone Rancid?

Monica Eng
Chicago Tribune

Does your cupboard hold a package of unfinished crackers? An old bag of whole grain flour? Some leftover nuts from holiday baking? Or perhaps a bottle of vegetable oil you've been slow to finish?

If so, you may be harboring dangerous, rancid foods.

Protecting against rancidity -- which occurs when oils oxidize -- has long been a challenge for home cooks, but a recent perfect stew of factors has made the issue more serious. Strangely enough, this situation comes courtesy of the rising popularity of "healthy" polyunsaturated fats, whole grain flours and warehouse stores -- not bad developments on their own, but taken together they've resulted in American pantries full of food that goes rancid much faster than we're used to.

Read more about the report here.

 

May 10, 2012

6-Year EU Obesity Platform Nears Completion, But Has It Worked?

A 6-year project tackling obesity and other diet and physical activity-related health issues across the European Union has spawned 300 individual positive actions by government, commercial and other actors – and is not set to wind up until next year.

Read more about the project here.

 

May 10, 2012

DSM et al Petition FDA To Fortify Corn Masa Flour With Folic Acid

A coalition of six organizations including vitamin giant DSM has petitioned the FDA to allow corn masa flour to be fortified with folic acid in a bid to decrease neural tube defects in the Hispanic community.

Read more about the report here.

 

May 10, 2012

New Therapy Could Reduce Diabetes-Related Amputation

Chicago Tribune

Jim Keenan wasn't particularly alarmed by a small blister that developed on his heel. Five days later, the 62-year-old's foot was so seriously infected doctors feared they might need to amputate his lower leg.
Keenan, who also has Type 2 diabetes, instead tried the emerging treatment called hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

Best known as an antidote for underwater diving disorders, HBOT involves inhaling pure oxygen while reclining in a pressurized chamber.

The intense flood of oxygen to the blood can stimulate cell growth, promote the formation of new blood vessels and fight certain infections, said Dr. Alan Davis, who directs the Center for Wound Care and HBOT at Northwest Hospital outside Baltimore.

Read more about the report here.

 

May 9, 2012

How Cruciferous Vegetables Prevent Cancer

United Press International

Cruciferous vegetables -- broccoli, cabbage, leafy greens, cauliflower -- help prevent breast and prostate cancer, U.S. researchers say.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University's Ingram Center showed a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables -- specifically the indoles they contain -- protects and improves breast cellular health.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 9, 2012

Harvard Red Meat Study Highlights Cancer risk

Diets high in red meat reduce life expectancy through an increased risk of cancer and cardio vascular disease, according to the results of a recent study from Harvard Medical School.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 9, 2012

Black Pepper Compound Fights Fat

In the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Korean researchers report that piperine, a pungent compound found in black pepper (Piper nigrum), helps block the formation of new fat cells, a process known as adipogenesis.

"Adipogenesis is a well-organized process regulated by adipogenic transcription factors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma), sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) family, and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) family," the authors write in their introduction. "Of these factors, PPAR-gamma has been focused on its role in adipocyte differentiation. In addition to being induced during adipogenesis, it is both necessary and sufficient for the process."

Read more about the study here.

 

May 8, 2012

Obesity could affect 42% of Americans by 2030

USA Today

WASHINGTON – A new forecast on America's obesity crisis has health experts fearing a dramatic jump in health care costs if nothing is done to bring the epidemic under control.

Read more about the report here.

 

May 8, 2012

Fast Food Diet Increases Risk Of Depression By More Than Fifty Percent

(NaturalNews) Providing more evidence to the motif 'you are what you eat', scientists have found that eating a fast food diet increases the risk for depression by more than fifty percent. The food we eat today will provide the structural network for the cellular matrix that we need to support basic metabolism, cellular regeneration and repair. This is especially pronounced in brain neurons, as grey matter is largely composed of the omega-3 fats, DHA and EPA. When we don't provide these basic building blocks, especially in the early formative years, the body is forced to use inferior fats such as those provided by hydrogenation, most frequently found in fast and processed foods.

 

May 7, 2012

Fibre May Protect Against Heart Disease In Women

High-fibre foods may offer good protection against cardiovascular disease, with the effects particularly marked in women, say researchers.

Read more about the study here.

 

May 5, 2012

PCBs Promote Dendrite Growth, May Increase Autism Risk

New research from UC Davis and Washington State University shows that PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, launch a cellular chain of events that leads to an overabundance of dendrites -- the filament-like projections that conduct electrochemical signals between neurons -- and disrupts normal patterns of neuronal connections in the brain.

Read more about the research here.

 

May 4, 2012

Garlic Compound 100 Times More Effective Than Antibiotics Fighting Food Borne Illness

An article published online in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy reveals a potent effect for garlic against the bacteria Campylobacter jejuni, a leading cause of intestinal illness caused by eating undercooked poultry or foods that have been contaminated during poultry preparation. "Campylobacter is simply the most common bacterial cause of food-borne illness in the United States and probably the world," explained coauthor Michael Konkel of Washington State University's College of Veterinary Medicine.

Read more about the report here.

 

May 3, 2012

Anita Creamer
The Sacramento Bee, Calif.

04-18-12

May 3, 2012

Hearing Loss A Hidden -- And Correctable -- Problem For Seniors

Anita Creamer
The Sacramento Bee, Calif.

At 100, Ann Stenzel is feisty and sharp, in part because her hearing aids, which she has used for a decade, keep her in touch with the world around her.

She likes to spend her mornings reading the newspaper in the sunny lobby of her seniors residence center, Eskaton Lodge Granite Bay, where she strikes up conversations with fellow residents.

"I don't want to miss anything," said Stenzel. "But half the people here can't hear. What they tell you is, 'Hearing aids? I don't need hearing aids.' It gets to me when they say that, because they do need them.
"They'll say it makes them feel old to get hearing aids. But wearing them makes me feel young."

The incidence of hearing loss, one of the hidden impairments of old age, has doubled in the past three decades. It affects 26.7 million Americans 50 and older, including four out of five people above age 80, and numbers are expected to rise with the aging of baby boomers.

Read more about the report here.
 

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