LivingFuel HealthAlerts - 2012 Archive 1


 

Feb. 29, 2012

Teen Hearing Risk From MP3 Players

United Press International

Twenty-five percent of teens are in danger of early hearing loss as a direct result of MP3 players, researchers in Israel say.

Chava Muchnik of Tel Aviv University, Dr. Ricky Kaplan-Neeman, Dr. Noam Amir and Ester Shabtai studied teens' music listening habits and took acoustic measurements of preferred listening levels.

MP3 players permit users to listen to crystal-clear audio at high volume for hours on end, but the personal listening devices are a serious health hazard, with teenagers as the most at-risk group, the researchers said.

The results, published in the International Journal of Audiology, demonstrated teens have harmful music-listening habits when it comes to iPods and other MP3 devices.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 29, 2012

Less Stroke With More Magnesium

Slightly higher intake of magnesium from the diet was associated with an 8% lower risk of stroke, based on an analysis of several studies. This doesn't necessarily mean you should get more magnesium from supplements, though.

For details, see the updated information in the Magnesium Supplement Review.

 

Feb. 28, 2012

What Can Be Done About Cognitive Decline In Mid-Life?

Whereas global life expectancy is on the rise, the maintenance of cognitive health becomes a public health priority, since poor cognitive status is considered a major disabling condition in old age. Previous studies have established an inverse association between age and cognitive performance, with most studies suggesting little cognitive decline occurs before the age of 60. Archana Singh-Manoux, from Inserm (France), and colleagues completed a large-scale prospective study conducted over a 10-year period, utilizing data from the Whitehall II cohort study involving 10,308 men and women, ages 45 to 70 years the start of the study. Over the 10-year study time frame, each subject was evaluated for memory, vocabulary, reasoning and verbal fluency on three separate occasions.

Read the results of the study here.

 

Feb. 28, 2012

Garlic Reduces Severity of Colds & Flu

Among the most widespread illnesses in the world, the common cold is estimated to be responsible for $20 billion per year in lost worker productivity. Susan S. Percival , from the University of Florida (Florida, USA), and colleagues enrolled 120 healthy subjects, average age 26 years, and randomly assigned each to receive either a daily supplement of aged garlic extract (2.56 g), or placebo, for 90 days. The team observed that the number of NK cells and gamma-delta T cells, two important types of immune cells, increased moreso in the garlic-supplemented group, as compared to those in the placebo group.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 27, 2012

Vitamin D Study With Post-Menopausal Women

NewsRx.com

SAN FRANCISCO - Wrist fractures, also called distal radius fractures (DRF), are among the most common osteoporosis-related fractures occurring on average 15 years earlier than hip fractures. As vitamin D deficiency has recently been linked with muscle weakness, increased fall risks, and bone fractures, investigators sought to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among post menopausal women with DRF. The study, "Hypovitaminosis D in Postmenopausal Women with a Distal Radius Fracture," was presented recently at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 27, 2012

Resveratrol Improves Post-Meall Glucose Levels In Pilot Study

The results of a pilot study of resveratrol supplementation published online recently in the Journal of Gerontology: Biological Sciences indicate a benefit for resveratrol supplementation in men and women with impaired glucose tolerance.

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York enrolled ten overweight or obese subjects aged 65 and older with elevated fasting and two hour glucose levels who were not using resveratrol or other antioxidant supplements within the three months prior to the study. Participants were randomized to 1.0, 1.5 or 2 grams resveratrol per day, to be consumed in divided doses for four weeks. Fasting and postmeal glucose, as well as insulin levels were measured before and at the end of the treatment period, and endothelial function was assessed during the meal test at the beginning and end of the study.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 24, 2012

Processed Meats Contribute to Diabetes

A diet loaded with hot dogs, lunch meat and Spam can significantly increase your risk of diabetes, according to research conducted by University of Washington scientists. In this study, scientists investigated the diets of rural-dwelling Native Americans and compared what they ate with diabetes rates.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 23, 2012

Health Benefits of Massage Therapy Demonstrated in New Study

Richard Halstead, The Marin Independent Journal, Novato, Calif.
Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News

Taking your medicine may get a whole lot easier now that a Buck Institute for Research on Aging study has produced scientific evidence that a massage does indeed help heal sore and stressed muscles.

The study, produced jointly by the Buck Institute in Novato and McMaster University in Canada, appears in an online edition of Science Translational Medicine. It shows that massage reduces inflammation, promotes the growth of new mitochondria in skeletal muscle and reduces muscle pain.

Read more about the study here.
 

Feb. 22, 2012

Anti-cancer Drug For Women Weakens Bone Density

Agence France-Presse

A drug tapped for widespread use to prevent breast cancer in post-menopausal women also accelerates loss of bone density, thus potentially boosting the risk of fractures, a study published on Tuesday said.
6Exemestane -- brand name Aromasin -- is part of a drug class called aromatase inhibitors, which lower levels of the oestrogen that some breast cancers need in order to grow.

Canadian bone specialists took a look at a group of patients who had taken part in a study into the effectiveness of exemestane among 4,500 healthy women with a worrying family history of breast cancer.
Overall, the big study showed that the drug was highly effective, reducing the risk of breast cancer by almost two-thirds.

The bone sub-study looked at 351 women who had been taking either exemestane or a dummy lookalike pill and whose bone density was measured with hi-tech scanners.

After two years, women taking exemestane had a high loss of bone density at a common fracture point in the wrist called the distal radius, and also at the lower end of the tibia, compared with their counterparts on placebo.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 22, 2012

Foods That Fight Memory Loss

There’s a new way to potentially prevent Alzheimer’s—a disease that we know frustratingly little about—and it’s not some exotic, expensive or potentially dangerous drug.

It’s actually an affordable, natural component that’s found in everyday foods. For the first time, there’s a human study that confirms an association between dietary choline, an amino acid found in eggs and some other foods, and better cognitive performance. The study, from Boston University School of Medicine, appeared in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Read more about the story here.

 

Feb. 21, 2012

Alzheimer's Research Is Called 'Stunning'


Spencer Hunt
The Columbus Dispatch, Ohio

A skin-cancer drug could offer hope for the millions of patients coping with the debilitating effects of Alzheimer's disease.

Scientists at Case Western Reserve University led a study of the drug bexarotene on mice and found that it helped wipe out a protein linked to Alzheimer's.

Their study, published recently in the journal Science, showed that the drug reduced the amount of amyloid beta by as much as 75 percent. The protein damages nerve cells.

The mice returned to normal behaviors three days after treatment with bexarotene, which is marketed as Targretin.
"No one, ourselves included, would have ever imagined that any drug would have worked with this speed," said Gary Landreth, a Case neuroscientist and lead researcher. "It's stunning."

There are an estimated 5.4 million people with Alzheimer's in the United States.

Read more about the report here.

 

Feb. 17, 2012

Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk

The February, 2012 issue of the journal Anticancer Research reports a lower risk for colorectal cancer in association with increased intake of calcium, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and folate.

Scientists from Canada and China matched 1,760 Canadian men and women with colorectal cancer with 2,481 control subjects. Dietary questionnaire responses were used to quantify the intake of calcium, iron, folate and vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D and E from food and supplements.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 14, 2012

Asian Apple Found to Reduce Diabetic Blood Sugar

A team of Malaysian researchers discovered that an extract from an apple popular in Southeast Asian countries can reduce high blood sugar.

In the study, researchers tested the ability of compounds within the apple (known as the “water apple”) to block the same key enzyme responsible for high blood sugars that many anti-diabetic drugs target.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 13, 2012

Indoor Air Particulates Spur Stroke, Bronchitis, and Premature Deaths

Americans spend an average of more than 65% of their time in their own home or others' homes, the health impacts of indoor air pollution has remained elusive. Jennifer Logue, from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (California, USA), and colleagues combined disease incidence and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs)-based health impact models to estimate the population average health costs related to chronic inhalation of air pollutants in U.S. residences.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 10, 2012

Lifestyle Blamed for 40 Percent of Cancers

United Press International

Forty percent of cancers in women and 45 percent in men could be prevented by a healthier lifestyle, British researchers say.

A Cancer Research UK report found more than 100,000 cancers each year in Britain are caused by four lifestyle factors -- smoking, unhealthy diet, alcohol and being overweight -- and the number rises to around 134,000 a year when 14 lifestyle and environmental factors are taken into account, the Guardian reported.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 10, 2012

Living with Coronary Heart Disease - What You Need to Know

In honor of American Heart Month, Health Dialog today announced it has made its award-winning patient decision aid, “Living with Coronary Heart Disease” available to the public for the month of February. The decision aid will be available as a public service offering to provide information and support to individuals living with the disease.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease. Health Dialog’s decision aid provides patients with information about the condition so that they may be more informed and empowered as they deal with the disease day-to-day, as so many people do.

Read more here.

 

Feb. 9, 2012

Supplementing a Mediterranean Diet With Coenzyme Q10 Lowers Inflammation

A crossover study described in the January, 2012 issue of the Journals of Gerontology Series A revealed that the addition of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to a Mediterranean diet lowers a number of indicators of inflammation in older men and women.

Researchers at the University of Cordoba and the Instituto de Salud Carlos III in Spain enrolled ten men and ten women aged 65 and older who were not being treated for inflammation or elevated lipids. Participants were randomized to receive one of three dietary regimens for a four week period, followed by two additional four week periods in which the regimens previously not received were administered. The regimens consisted of a Mediterranean diet, which contains high amounts of vegetables, fruit, olive oil and other healthy foods; a Mediterranean diet supplemented with 200 milligrams per day coenzyme Q10, and a Western diet providing 38 percent of total energy as fat and containing high amounts of saturated fat. Fasting and postprandial blood samples collected at the end of each intervention were analyzed for the expression of genes involved in inflammation.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 8, 2012

Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Improve Memory in Two Year Trial

A recent issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published the results of an analysis of a randomized, controlled trial conducted by Australian researchers which found that supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B12 improved immediate and delayed memory in older men and women.

The current study analyzed data from a trial of 900 participants with elevated psychological distress between the ages 60 to 74 who received 400 micrograms folic acid plus 100 micrograms vitamin B12, or a placebo for two years. The original trial was designed to analyze the effect of the supplements and other factors on depressive symptoms. (Late life depression is a risk factor for cognitive impairment.) Cognitive function was assessed at the beginning of the study and at 12 and 24 months.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 8, 2012

New Research About Reducing Ovarian Cancer Cell Growth

In the journal BMC Medicine, Professor Sanjay K. Srivastava and Prabodh K. Kandala of Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Amarillo report the discovery of a mechanism for diindolylmethane (DIM), an active metabolite of indole-3-carbinol found in cruciferous vegetables, to induce programmed cell death (apoptosis) in cultured ovarian cancer cells.
 
Previous research uncovered an inhibitory effect for DIM on ovarian cancer cell growth, yet the mechanism involved remained unknown. The current study explored the effects of DIM in several ovarian cancer lines. Drs Srivastava and Kandala found that DIM induces apoptosis, and that it exerts its effects by blocking the production and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a transcription factor that is associated with the growth and survival of cells which is over-expressed in cases of resistance to the chemotherapy cisplatin. DIM also reduced the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in ovarian tumor cells, and inhibited cell invasion and angiogenesis via suppression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and vascular epithelial growth factor.

Read more about the research here.

 

 

Feb. 7, 2012

Eight Reasons Wheat Is Making You Gain Weight

Hollis Templeton
Mclatchy-Tribune News Service.

It's been drilled into our heads that whole grains are heart-healthy and essential to a diet that keeps us slim and satisfied. But the wheat toast you opt for over a muffin or bagel in the a.m. may not be as smart of a dietary decision as once thought. In his new book "Wheat Belly," preventative cardiologist William Davis, MD, argues that the world's most popular grain, found in everything from lager to licorice to lunch meat, is destructive to weight loss - and overall health.

According to Davis, the compounds found in wheat are responsible for appetite stimulation, exaggerated rises in blood sugar, and the release of endorphin-like chemicals that get the brain hooked on breads, pastas and crackers, while increased wheat consumption can also be linked to higher incidences of celiac disease, diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and schizophrenia.

If you think this talk about wheat sounds like a new spin on the gluten-free fad, it's not so simple. While wheat is the dominant source of gluten in the human diet - gluten is what gives dough the ability to be stretched, rolled and shaped into bagels, pretzels and pizza crusts and is the culprit underlying inflammatory damage to the intestinal tract in those with celiac disease - it also contains a unique carbohydrate called amylopectin-A, which sends blood sugar soaring higher than table sugar or a candy bar ever could.

Read more about the report here.

 

Feb. 7, 2012

Walnuts Slow Growth Of Prostate Cancer In Mice

Bill Lindelof
The Sacramento Bee, Calif.

New research in mice by UC Davis shows that walnuts slow the growth of prostate cancer.
Mice fed a diet with walnuts had smaller, slower growing tumors, the researchers reported in the current issue of the British Journal of Nutrition.

A low-fat diet is often recommended for reducing the risk for developing or slowing growth of prostate cancer. However, the UC Davis study suggests that not eating walnuts may be a mistake.
Walnuts are rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fats, antioxidants and other plant chemicals. Eschewing walnuts may mean foregoing the protective effects of walnuts on tumor growth.

Read more about the research here.

 

Feb. 7, 2012

Reversing the Irreversible [video]

From NaturalNews Report

Valya Boutenko's newest film release reveals the true story of how 37 people reversed so-called "incurable" disease by unleashing their innate healing powers. Flying in the face of conventional medical wisdom -- which really isn't wise at all -- this film celebrates the simple yet powerful truths about reversing chronic disease that the established medical system won't dare talk about.

Watch the preview here.

 

Feb. 6, 2012

Mayo Clinic Study - Men with Strokes Call for Help Quicker Than Women

It’s been said that marriage is good for your health – especially if you’re a man. Research at Mayo Clinic in Arizona shows that’s true when it comes to seeking care for stroke symptoms.

A Mayo Clinic study, presented at the American Stroke Conference in New Orleans in early February, says that men experiencing a stroke call for emergency help quicker than women, especially if they are married.

“Marriage has long been shown to offer health benefits and often more for men,” said Joyce Lee-Iannotti, MD, a neurology Fellow at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, and author of the study. “The reasons are unclear, but it’s been postulated that it can be societal roles, where women take on the roles of caregivers and advise their spouses to seek care, often putting their own health behind that of their children and husband.”

The study was a retrospective review of 209 patients with acute stroke symptoms brought by emergency medical services to Mayo Clinic in Phoenix over 15 months ending in November 2011. Researchers collected participants’ age, gender, marital status, time of symptom awareness and time of emergency medical services dispatch. They compared the time from symptoms awareness to EMS dispatch between married and single participants and between men and women.

Read more about the study here.

 

Feb. 4, 2012

Research - Bariatric Surgery Not Effective for Diabetes Reversal

Blue Heron Health News
by Jodi Knapp

In the early part of the 21st century, bariatric surgery physicians were convinced that they had found a single treatment that cured both obesity and diabetes: bariatric surgery.

A decade later, research is beginning to mount against the diabetes benefits of this popular weight loss treatment, according to a report published in the British Journal of Surgery.

Read more about the report here.

 

Feb. 3, 2012

Diet Patterns May Keep Brain from Shrinking

ST. PAUL, Minn. – People with diets high in several vitamins or in omega 3 fatty acids are less likely to have the brain shrinkage associated with Alzheimer’s disease than people whose diets are not high in those nutrients, according to a new study published in the December 28, 2011, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Those with diets high in omega 3 fatty acids and in vitamins C, D, E and the B vitamins also had higher scores on mental thinking tests than people with diets low in those nutrients. These omega 3 fatty acids and vitamin D are primarily found in fish. The B vitamins and antioxidants C and E are primarily found in fruits and vegetables.

Read more about the study here.

 

Jan. 26, 2012

Plant Flavanoid Shows Potential To Block Cancer Pathways

The flavonoid luteolin could inhibit signalling pathways important to the growth of colon cancer cells, according to new research.

Read more about the research here.

 

Jan. 24, 2012

New Predictor of Heart Attack or Stroke

A rise in blood pressure during middle age significantly raises the risk of having a heart attack or a stroke during a person’s lifetime, report Northwestern University School of Medicine (Illinois, USA) researchers. Previous estimates of a person's risk of cardiovascular disease were based on a single blood pressure measurement: the higher the blood pressure reading, the greater the risk.

Norrina Allen and colleagues analyzed data from 61,585 participants in the Cardiovascular Lifetime Risk Pooling Project. Starting with baseline blood pressure readings at age 41, researchers measured blood pressure again at age 55, then followed the patients until the occurrence of a first heart attack or stroke, death or age 95.

Men who developed high blood pressure in middle age or who started out with high blood pressure had a 70% risk of having a heart attack or stroke, compared to a 41% risk for men who maintained low blood pressure or whose blood pressure decreased during the time period.

Women who developed high blood pressure had almost a 50% risk of a heart attack or stroke, compared to a 22% risk for those who kept their blood pressure low or saw a decrease.

Read more about the study here.

 

Jan. 21, 2012

Fifteen Minutes of Exercise A Day Can Extend Life Expectancy

Deutsche Presse-Agentur (dpa)

Berlin (dpa) - Taking a minimum of 15 minutes of exercise a day can extend life expectancy by up to three years, according to Germany's Society of Neurologists and the Stroke Society.

A regular program of exercise can reduce the risk of stroke, cardiovascular illness, cancer and diabetes. The advice is based on a study of over 400,000 participants in Taiwan whose health status was checked regularly over eight years.
The study discovered that 15 minutes of exercise a day made a surprising contribution to improving overall health. The mortality rate for those who took the exercise was 14 per cent lower than the inactive participants.

Read more about the study here.

 

Jan. 20, 2012

Poor Diet of Mom-To-Be Linked to Diabetes

United Press International

In both rats and humans, what a mother-to-be eats impacts how her child stores fats later, researchers in Britain said.

Professor Anne Willis of the Medical Research Council Toxicology Unit at the University of Leicester said storing fats in the right areas of the body is important because otherwise they can accumulate in places like the liver and muscle where they are more likely to lead to disease.

"One of the ways that our bodies cope with a rich modern western diet is by storing excess calories in fat cells," Willis said in a statement. "When these cells aren't able to absorb the excess then fats get deposited in other places, like the liver, where they are much more dangerous and can lead to type 2 diabetes."

The research team found that this process is controlled by a molecule called miR-483-3p. Willis and colleagues found that miR-483-3p was produced at higher levels in individuals who had experienced a poor diet in their mother's wombs than those who were better nourished.

Read more about the research here.

 

Jan. 19, 2012

New Predictor of Heart Attack or Stroke

A rise in blood pressure during middle age significantly raises the risk of having a heart attack or a stroke during a person’s lifetime, report Northwestern University School of Medicine (Illinois) researchers. Previous estimates of a person's risk of cardiovascular disease were based on a single blood pressure measurement.: the higher the blood pressure reading, the greater the risk.

Norrina Allen and colleagues analyzed data from 61,585 participants in the Cardiovascular Lifetime Risk Pooling Project. Starting with baseline blood pressure readings at age 41, researchers measured blood pressure again at age 55, then followed the patients until the occurrence of a first heart attack or stroke, death or age 95.

Read more about the study here.

 

Jan. 18, 2012

Eggs Offer Many Health Benefits

(NaturalNews) Perhaps you've skipped this breakfast gem for fear of raising your cholesterol. Free yourself from that misconception and indulge in the treasure that a good ol' egg has to offer. Three eggs per day over a 12-week period for obese participants on a carbohydrate restricted diet actually lowered the bad LDL cholesterol and raised the good HDL. Another study showed that two eggs per day for six weeks did not affect cholesterol levels or brachial artery endothelial function. Yet another study demonstrated that people eating equal to or more than 4 eggs per week had lower cholesterol levels than those eating less than or one egg per week .

 

Jan. 18, 2012

Supplementing with Calcium and Vitamin D - Decreased Adominal Fat

The results of two double-blind, placebo-controlled trials described online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition conclude a beneficial effect for calcium and vitamin D in reducing visceral adipose tissue—fat that accumulates in the abdomen which is associated with several metabolic disorders.

A team from Massachusetts General Hospital randomized 88 overweight or obese men and women to receive a glass of orange juice fortified with 350 milligrams calcium and 100 international units vitamin D3, or nonfortified orange juice three times daily for 16 weeks. A separate trial of 83 men and women evaluated the effects of calcium and vitamin D-fortified "lite" orange juice, which has fewer calories than regular orange juice. Physical examinations conducted at the beginning of the study and at four week intervals ascertained weight and waist circumference. Computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdomen assessed visceral and subcutaneous fat tissue before and after treatment.

Read more about the study here.

 

Jan. 17, 2012

Indoor Air Particulates Spur Stroke, Bronchitis, and Premature Deaths

Americans spend an average of more than 65% of their time in their own home or others' homes, the health impacts of indoor air pollution has remained elusive. Jennifer Logue, from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (California, USA), and colleagues combined disease incidence and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs)-based health impact models to estimate the population average health costs related to chronic inhalation of air pollutants in U.S. residences. The team used disease impact models and incidence to identify those indoor air pollutants with the greatest impacts on health.

Read more about the report here.

 

Jan. 16, 2012

Higher Vitamin D levels Correlated With Less Depression

A recent edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings published the results of a cross-sectional study conducted by the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and the Cooper Institute which uncovered a protective effect for high serum vitamin D levels against depression. The study, which included 12,594 men and women, is the largest of its kind to date.

University of Texas professor of psychiatry E. Sherwood Brown and his associates analyzed data from participants in the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study, which enrolled patients from the Cooper Clinic from November, 2006, to October, 2010. Subjects were categorized as depressed in accordance with Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores, and serum samples were analyzed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

Read more about the study here.

 

Jan. 10, 2012

An Anti-Inflammatory Diet

An anti inflammatory diet is one which reduces the consumption of foods which increase chronic inflammation, and substitutes foods which decrease chronic inflammation.

Inflammation is a helpful process when it is appropriate to the cause. For instance, if you have an infection, your body will mount an inflammatory response which kills off the infecting bacteria, and helps you get well again.

However, chronic inflammation is not good for the body, and points to damage being done by pro-inflammatory substances within the body.

Read more about the anti-inflammatory diet here.

 

Jan. 5, 2012

Reduced Childhood Vitamin D Levels Predict Diabetes

In an article appearing in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Micah Olson, MD, of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and her associates report that children suffering from obesity and insulin resistance (which are both associated with diabetes) are more likely to have reduced serum levels of vitamin D in comparison with non-overweight children.

The current study evaluated serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, fasting glucose and insulin levels, insulin resistance and other factors in 411 obese and 87 non-overweight children between the ages of six and sixteen residing in North Texas. Dietary information collected from the participants included daily intake of milk, soda, juice, fruit and vegetables, and whether or not the subject regularly ate breakfast.

Read more about the study here.

 

Jan. 5, 2012

Higher Plasma Nutrient Levels Associated With Increased Brain Volume

In an article published online in the journal Neurology, Gene Bowman, ND, MPH, of Oregon Health & Science University in Portland and his colleagues report a beneficial effect on brain volume for healthy dietary patterns as reflected by plasma nutrient levels in older men and women.

One hundred four participants with an average age of 87 who had few risk factors for cognitive impairment were tested for 30 nutrient biomarkers including vitamins B, C, E and E, omega-3 fatty acids and trans fatty acids. All subjects were evaluated for memory and cognitive function, and 42 participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to assess brain volume, which frequently declines with aging.

Read more about the report here.

 

Jan. 4, 2012

Meta-Analysis - Reduced Vitamin D Levels With Greater Risk of Dying

The results of a meta-analysis published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reaffirm an increased risk of all-cause mortality over follow-up periods ranging from 1.3 to 24 years in association with having reduced serum levels of vitamin D.

For their review, Sara Gandini of the European Institute of Oncology and her associates selected 14 prospective cohort studies in which serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels were determined for a total of 62,548 men and women with an average age of 45 to 80 years. Over the studies' varying follow-up periods, 5,562 deaths occurred.

Read more about the report here.

 

Jan. 4, 2012

Mid-morning Snack May Sabotage Weight Loss

United Press International

Women dieters who snack between breakfast and lunch do not lose more weight compared with those who abstain from a mid-morning snack, U.S. researchers say.

Study leader Dr. Anne McTiernan of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center said the study involved 123 overweight-to-obese postmenopausal Seattle-area women ages 50-75.

The women were randomly assigned to either a diet-alone intervention with a goal: 1,200 to 2,000 calories a day, depending on starting weight, and fewer than 30 percent of daily calories from fat, or diet plus exercise with the same calorie and fat restrictions plus 45 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise per day, five days a week. The women, who received nutrition counseling, were not given any specific instructions or recommendations about snacking. For the purposes of the study, a snack was defined as any food or drink consumed between main meals.

Read more about the report here.

 

Jan. 3, 2012

Doctor Says Whole Wheat Packs on Belly Fat

Hollis Templeton
Mclatchy-Tribune News Service.

It's been drilled into our heads that whole grains are heart-healthy and essential to a diet that keeps us slim and satisfied. But the wheat toast you opt for over a muffin or bagel in the a.m. may not be as smart of a dietary decision as once thought. In his new book "Wheat Belly," preventative cardiologist William Davis, MD, argues that the world's most popular grain, found in everything from lager to licorice to lunch meat, is destructive to weight loss - and overall health.

According to Davis, the compounds found in wheat are responsible for appetite stimulation, exaggerated rises in blood sugar, and the release of endorphin-like chemicals that get the brain hooked on breads, pastas and crackers, while increased wheat consumption can also be linked to higher incidences of celiac disease, diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and schizophrenia.

Read more about the report here.

 

Jan. 3, 2012

Daily Multivitamin May Help to Boost Memory

Cognitive acuity declines with age, and a number of previous studies have suggested both individual and combination nutritional approaches as a means of slowing the decline. Helen Macpherson, from Swinburne University (Australia), and colleagues enrolled 56 elderly women, with subjective complaints of memory loss, in a sixteen-week long study. At both the studies start and end, cognition was assessed using an age-sensitive computerized battery of memory and attention tests. biochemical measures of selected nutrients, homocysteine, markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and blood safety parameters were collected. The team observed that a mixture of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and plant extracts significantly improved spatial working memory. As well, the supplementation decreased levels of homocysteine. No toxicity was reported. The researchers submit that: “Sixteen weeks of supplementation with a combined multivitamin, mineral and herbal formula may benefit working memory in elderly women at risk of cognitive decline.”

Read more about the study here.

 

Jan. 2, 2012

Adolescent Alcohol Consumption and Breast Cancer

NewsRx.com

Breast cancer patients often wonder what their daughters might do to reduce their risk of also developing cancer. Are there dietary intakes or behaviors that can be modified by their daughters to lower their own chances of getting the disease? A new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, sought information relevant to this question.

Dr. Catherine Berkey, a biostatistician at Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, led a team that investigated childhood and adolescent risk factors for benign breast disease among girls with a family history of breast cancer. Benign breast disease, a large class of breast ailments that can cause breast lumps or breast pain, is a known risk factor for breast cancer. The authors found that among adolescent girls with a family history of breast cancer (or maternal benign breast disease), there was a significant association between amount of alcohol consumed and further increased risk of getting benign breast disease as young women (see also Breast Cancer).

Read more about the study here.
 
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