LivingFuel HealthAlerts - 2011 Archive 4


 

August 31, 2011

Lower Blood Pressure Naturally

Several studies throughout the years have proven that food high in potassium citrate drastically lowers blood pressure.

A study from St. George’s Medical School in London took group of people averaging hypertension of 151/93. After two weeks on potassium citrate, their blood pressure had dropped down to 138/88 on the average.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 30, 2011

Omega-3 May Slash Levels of Heart Disease Risk Factor

by Stephen Daniells

Supplements of omega-3 fatty acids are associated with lower levels of an amino acid called homocysteine, an amino acid linked to increased risks of heart disease and dementia, says a new meta-analysis of the scientific evidence.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 24, 2011

Breakfasts With Protein, Fiber Start The School Year Right

By Nanci Hellmich, USA TODAY

The ABCs of a nutritious breakfast are now backed by science. New research shows that you'll feel full longer and may get less hungry throughout the day if your first meal has protein-rich foods, such as eggs, Greek yogurt, low-fat dairy products or lean meat, and fiber-filled fare, such whole-wheat bread, whole-grain cereal, fruit and vegetables.

These foods appear to have more staying power than highly processed foods such as bagels, muffins, doughnuts and sugary cereals.

The findings are especially important for school-aged children who may be ravenous by lunch time if they don't eat a good breakfast.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 24, 2011

Magnesium Deficiency Linked to Higher Risk of Osteoporosis?

PRNewswire

A magnesium deficiency reduces the absorption and metabolism of calcium and prevents the proper amount of calcium being directed toward building stronger bones. According to Dr. Carolyn Dean, MD, ND, magnesium expert and Medical Director of the nonprofit Nutritional Magnesium Association (http://www.nutritionalmagnesium.org), the effectiveness and benefits of calcium with respect to bone health and the prevention of osteoporosis are greatly impaired in the absence of adequate levels of magnesium in the body.

"Magnesium keeps calcium dissolved in the blood. Without the proper balance of magnesium to calcium, about a 1:1 ratio, calcium ends up depositing in your kidneys and can create kidney stones, in your coronary arteries resulting in clogged arteries, and in joint cartilage, rather than in your bones where you need it most. The more calcium you take without the balancing effect of magnesium, the more symptoms of magnesium deficiency and calcium excess you are liable to experience," Dr. Dean says.

Read more about the doctor's report here.

 

August 23, 2011

Prunes Exceptional in Preventing Fractures

United Press International

Dried plums, or prunes, improve bone health in people of all ages, but may be most helpful for post-menopausal women, U.S. researchers say.

Bahram H. Arjmandi of Florida State University and colleagues at Oklahoma State University tested two groups of post-menopausal women over a 12-month period. The first group, consisting of 55 women, was instructed to consume about 10 prunes each day, while the second group -- a comparative control group of 45 women -- was told to consume a similar amount of dried apples.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 23, 2011

Early Morning Exercise is Best for Reducing Blood Pressure

BOONE—It may seem counterintuitive, but if you need to lower your blood pressure and also want a good night’s sleep, 7 a.m. is the best time to exercise.

Appalachian State University’s Dr. Scott Collier is researching the various beneficial effects of exercise on blood pressure. Collier is an assistant professor in the Department of Health, Leisure and Exercise Science in Appalachian’s College of Health Sciences.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 22, 2011

“Evil” Form of Fat Linked to High Blood Pressure

Visceral adiposity, not abdominal subcutaneous fat area, is associated with high blood pressure in Japanese men: the Ohtori study

A particularly harmful form of fat –known as visceral fat—has more to do with high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease than total body fat, according to a recent research study in "Hypertension Research.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 20, 2011

Anti-Aging Lifestyle Helps to Prevent Dementia

Improving and maintaining health factors not traditionally associated with dementia, such as denture fit, vision and hearing, may lower a person's risk for developing dementia. Kenneth Rockwood, from Dalhousie University (Canada), and colleagues studied 7,239 people who were free of dementia ages 65 and older, enrolled in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging. After five years and again after 10 years, they were evaluated for Alzheimer's disease and all types of dementia. Participants were asked questions about 19 health problems not previously reported to predict dementia. Problems included arthritis, trouble hearing or seeing, denture fit, chest or skin problems, stomach or bladder troubles, sinus issues, broken bones and feet or ankle conditions, among others.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 19, 2011

Nut Consumption Improves Glycemic and Lipid Control

Eating nuts every day could help control Type 2 diabetes and prevent its complications. David Jenkins, from the University of Toronto (Canada), and colleagues provided three different diet supplements to subjects with Type 2 diabetes. One group was given muffins, one was provided with a mixture of nuts including raw almonds, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, cashews, and macadamias, and one group was given a mixture of muffins and nuts. Subjects receiving the nut-only supplement reported the greatest improvement in blood glucose control using the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) test.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 18, 2011

Protein-Rich Diet Curbs Appetite

Previously, research has shown that higher-protein diets, containing 18 to 35% of daily calorie intake from dietary protein, are associated with reductions in hunger and increased fullness throughout the day and into the evening hours. Heather Leidy, from the University of Missouri (Missouri, USA), and colleagues completed study in which two groups ate either 25 or 14% of calories from protein, while the total calories and percent of calories from fat stayed the same between the higher-protein and normal-protein diet patterns.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 17, 2011

Green Tea Intake Shows Protective Effect Against Flu

In addition to ensuring optimal intake of vitamins C and D during the upcoming flu season, it may be wise to regularly indulge in a soothing pot of green tea, according to the results of a Japanese study published online in the Journal of Nutrition.

Researchers at the University of Shizuoka and Kikugawa General Hospital conducted two surveys of 2,050 pupils aged 6 to 13 who resided in a tea plantation area of Japan during influenza season from November, 2008 to February, 2009. The responses provided information concerning the frequency and quantity of green tea intake, preventive measures taken against influenza, and the incidence and duration of infections.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 16, 2011

Processed, Red Meat Linked to Diabetes

By Nanci Hellmich, USA TODAY
USA TODAY

Skip the hot dogs, hold the bacon and forget the sausage.

Eating processed meats and red meat regularly increases your risk of type 2 diabetes, a large study shows.

Harvard School of Public Health researchers analyzed dietary-intake data from more than 200,000 people in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and the Nurses' Health Studies. The participants have been tracked for a decade or more.

The scientists also did a larger analysis, combining their data and that from other published studies to analyze the diets of 442,101 people. About 28,000 of these people developed type 2 diabetes.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 16, 2011

Six Reasons Exercise Benefits You

Shamonteil L. Vaughn
Mclatchy-Tribune News Service.

You already know that exercise can lead to weight loss, but what are the other benefits of exercising?
Get better and easier sleep

If you've ever walked in from a hard day's workout and wanted to go to sleep, then you know the power of good exercise. If you have trouble sleeping, exercise may do the trick but don't exercise too late at night. It takes time for your heart rate to come down so if you're doing jumping jacks and immediately expect to drift off shortly after, chances are it won't happen. Not getting enough sleep can also lead to weight gain.

Read more of the report here.

 

August 16, 2011

As With Blood, Several Types of Human Gut

Agence France-Presse

The human digestive track, host to an ecosystem teaming with trillions of living bacteria, comes in three variations as distinct as blood groups, according to a recent study.

These so-called "enterotypes" are found in populations worldwide and exist independent of race, country of origin, diet, age or state of health, the study reported.

The findings have major implications for detecting and predicting the risk of diseases ranging from intestinal cancers to diabetes to Crohn's disease, a painful inflammation of the bowels, the researchers said.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 15, 2011

Short-term Calorie Cutting and Diabetes

Reducing calories as part of a dieting bout is common fare for type 2 diabetics. However, a new research study conducted by scientists at the Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre found that a short-term intervention of extreme calorie cutting can improve symptoms of type 2 diabetes dramatically.

The study assigned a group of long-standing type 2 diabetics to a very low calorie liquid diet that consisted of only 600 calories per day for 7-days. Remarkably, blood sugar levels returned to normal by the end of the 7-day bout. The researchers note that the mini-fast allows the pancreas and liver to clear out excess accumulated fat –which pushes the reset button on carbohydrate metabolism.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 12, 2011

Stay Fuller Longer With Protein, Fiber

By Nanci Hellmich, USA TODAY

The ABCs of a nutritious breakfast are now backed by science.

New research shows you'll feel full longer and may get less hungry throughout the day if your first meal has protein-rich foods, such as eggs, Greek yogurt, low-fat dairy products or lean meat, and fiber-filled fare, such whole-wheat bread, whole-grain cereal, fruit and vegetables.

These foods appear to have more staying power than highly processed foods such as bagels, muffins, doughnuts and sugary cereals.

The findings are especially important for school-age children who may be ravenous by lunchtime if they don't eat a good breakfast.

Read more about the research here.

 

August 12, 2011

Anti-Aging Lifestyle Helps to Prevent Dementia

Improving and maintaining health factors not traditionally associated with dementia, such as denture fit, vision and hearing, may lower a person's risk for developing dementia. Kenneth Rockwood, from Dalhousie University (Canada), and colleagues studied 7,239 people who were free of dementia ages 65 and older, enrolled in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging. After five years and again after 10 years, they were evaluated for Alzheimer's disease and all types of dementia. Participants were asked questions about 19 health problems not previously reported to predict dementia. Problems included arthritis, trouble hearing or seeing, denture fit, chest or skin problems, stomach or bladder troubles, sinus issues, broken bones and feet or ankle conditions, among others.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 11, 2011

Protein-Rich Diet Curbs Appetite

Previously, research has shown that higher-protein diets, containing 18 to 35% of daily calorie intake from dietary protein, are associated with reductions in hunger and increased fullness throughout the day and into the evening hours. Heather Leidy, from the University of Missouri (Missouri, USA), and colleagues completed a study in which two groups ate either 25 or 14% of calories from protein, while the total calories and percent of calories from fat stayed the same between the higher-protein and normal-protein diet patterns. Concurrently, the team also conducted an eating frequency substudy in which the 27 participants on both normal- and higher-protein diets consumed either three meals or six meals per day.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 11, 2011

Nut Consumption Improves Glycemic and Lipid Control

Eating nuts every day could help control Type 2 diabetes and prevent its complications. David Jenkins, from the University of Toronto (Canada), and colleagues provided three different diet supplements to subjects with Type 2 diabetes. One group was given muffins, one was provided with a mixture of nuts including raw almonds, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, cashews, and macadamias, and one group was given a mixture of muffins and nuts.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 10, 2011

New Report - Exercise Can Help Cancer Survivors

CIARAN JONES
Western Mail

EXERCISE is a "wonder drug" for cancer survivors and may even prevent the disease coming back, according to a report published this month.

Macmillan Cancer Support said physical activity should be "prescribed" by doctors after "hard evidence" showed it can significantly help recovery and prevent other long-term illnesses.

Rather than patients being told to "rest up" as in the past, doctors must encourage people to get moving as soon as they feel able.

A review of more than 60 studies for the charity found people undergoing treatment for cancer - as well as survivors - could benefit from exercise.

During treatment, being active does not worsen people's fatigue and has positive effects on mood and wellbeing, the study said.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 9, 2011

Study - Type 2 Diabetes In Newly Diagnosed 'Can Be Reversed'

BBC News

An extreme eight-week diet of 600 calories a day can reverse Type 2 diabetes in people newly diagnosed with the disease, says a Diabetologia study.

Newcastle University researchers found the low-calorie diet reduced fat levels in the pancreas and liver, which helped insulin production return to normal.

Seven out of 11 people studied were free of diabetes three months later, say findings published in the journal.

Read about the study here.

 

August 9, 2011

A 'Little Bit' of Exercise Can Work Wonders for Heart Health

By Janice Lloyd, USA TODAY

More research shows that even small amounts of aerobic exercise help lower coronary heart disease risk, according to a review published in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association.

The mega-study is part of a growing body of research showing that some physical activity provides health benefits -- even when levels fall below the recommended federal guidelines of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity a week. For the first time since 1998, the American College of Sports Medicine updated its exercise guidelines in June, including information on how little exercise is needed to achieve health benefits.

"The biggest health benefits we saw were for those who went from doing nothing to those doing something small," says Jacob Sattelmair, author of the new AHA study. "Even a little bit of activity makes a significant difference" -- and a little bit means 10 to 15 minutes a day.

Read more about the research here.

 

August 8, 2011

Vitamin D Insufficiency Associated With Football Injuries

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting held in San Diego was the site of a presentation of the finding of Michael Shindle, MD of Summit Medical Group and his colleagues of a higher incidence of vitamin D insufficiency among National Football League players with muscle injuries.

The current study included 89 NFL players aged 21 to 32 years. Fifty-eight subjects were African American and 31 were Caucasian. Sixteen of the players suffered from a muscle injury. Vitamin D levels were tested in the spring of 2010 during routine pre-season evaluations.

Read more about the study here.

 

August 5, 2011

Is Insomnia Caused By Lack Of Nutrients?

Most people think of calcium and phosphorus as the most important dietary components for bone health. But magnesium also plays an important role. It is involved in hundreds of biochemical reactions, many of which help keep not only bones strong, but the heart rhythm healthy and the nervous system functioning smoothly.

A study by ARS physiologist Henry C. Lukaski and nutritionist Forrest H. Nielsen reveals important findings on the effects of depleted body magnesium levels on energy metabolism. Lukaski is assistant director of ARS's Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, North Dakota. He and Nielsen, with the center's clinical nutrition support staff, showed that inadequate magnesium is associated with a need for increased oxygen during exercise. They found that during moderate activity, those with low magnesium levels in muscle are likely to use more energy—and therefore to tire more quickly—than those with adequate levels.

 

August 4, 2011

Is Cancer Curable ... Now?

[Natural News]

In this professionally filmed feature-length documentary, you'll meet Marcus Freudenmann and his wife Sabrina, a naturopathic doctor, who traveled the world with their four children for almost three years to meet experts in the field of alternative cancer treatment. Their mission was to create a film about natural cancer treatments that would "wake up the world."

The result of that effort is a powerful, groundbreaking documentary. It's powerful enough to awaken millions of people to alternative cancer treatments and help them realize that conventional cancer treatments are outdated and unnecessarily destructive.

Read more about the documentary here.

 

August 3, 2011

Vitamin C Improves Hospitalized Patients' Mood

Researchers at McGill University and Jewish Medical Hospital in Montreal report in the journal Nutrition the finding of an improvement in mood among acutely hospitalized patients supplemented with vitamin C.

In their introduction to the article, Michelle Zhang and her coauthors remark that a recent survey uncovered reduced levels of vitamin C in 60 percent of acute medical ward patients in a Montreal teaching hospital, compared to 16 percent of those tested in the hospital's outpatient department. A response to systemic inflammation that often occurs in hospitalized patients could redistribute vitamin C or increase breakdown of the vitamin, resulting in deficiency.

Read more about the report here.

 

August 2, 2011

Citrus Compounds Help to Reduce Inflammation

An extensive body of epidemiological studies has linked increased dietary intake of antioxidants from fruits, vegetables wine, chocolate, coffee, tea, and other foods to reduced risks of a range of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Increased intakes of compounds called flavonoids from citrus may be associated with lower levels of markers of inflammation, reports Rikard Landberg, from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and colleagues.

Read more about the research here.

 

August 1, 2011

Frequent Walking Helps Reduce Snoring

Getting out of your chair regularly and walking frequently might have an unlikely benefit of reduced snoring, says a Toronto sleep researcher.

 

Douglas Bradley, director of the Toronto Research Institute’s Sleep Research Laboratory, has linked excessive sitting to sleep apnea, a condition where a sleeping person’s throat collapses, stopping breathing and interrupting sleep.

 

Read more about the research here.

 

July 29, 2011

Progressive Resistance Training Counteracts Age-Related Muscle Loss

University of Michigan scientists reveal that not only can we fight the battle of strength and muscle loss as we age, we can even build muscle and strength well into seniorhood. "Resistance exercise is a great way to increase lean muscle tissue and strength capacity so that people can function more readily in daily life," says Mark Peterson, from the University of Michigan Physical Activity and Exercise Intervention Research Laboratory, explaining that: "Our analyses of current research show that the most important factor in somebody's function is their strength capacity. No matter what age an individual is, they can experience significant strength improvement with progressive resistance exercise even into the eighth and ninth decades of life.”

Read more about the study here.

 

July 29, 2011

Curcumin Compound Boosts Head and Neck Cancer Therapy

The American Medical Association journal Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery recently published the finding of researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center of a benefit for a derivative of curcumin, which occurs in the spice turmeric, in the treatment of head and neck cancer with cisplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug. The development of chemotherapy-resistant tumor cells is a major cause of treatment failure in head and neck cancer, resulting in relapse or metastasis.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 28, 2011

What's Really In The Food?

(NaturalNews) Ever wonder what's really in the food sold at grocery stores around the world? People keep asking me, "What ingredients should I avoid?" So I put together a short list that covers all the most toxic and disease-promoting ingredients in the food supply. These are the substances causing cancer, diabetes, heart disease and leading to tens of billions of dollars in unnecessary health care costs across America (and around the world).

 

If you want to stay healthy and out of the hospital, read ingredients labels and make sure you avoid all these ingredients:

 

Read more about the report here.

 

July 26, 2011

Chia Seeds May Offer Heart and Liver Benefits

By Nathan Gray

Consumption of chia seeds as a source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) may bring about redistribution associated with heart and liver protection, according to new research in rats.

The study, published in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, reports that rats fed chia seed supplements were protected from heart and liver problems associated with a high-fat diet, including improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, reduced visceral adiposity, decreased liver fat, and lower cardiac and hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 26, 2011

Kemin Launches Water-Extracted Green Tea Powder

By Elaine Watson

Kemin Health has launched a green tea powder for the dietary supplements market it says retains the composition and antioxidant profile of brewed green tea and provides an alternative to solvent-based extracts.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 26, 2011

Attorney Talks About Vitamin D Qualified Health Claims

By Elaine Watson

It could be several months before a qualified health claims petition about vitamin D is submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), according to the lawyer coordinating the application.

Jonathan Emord from Virginia-based legal firm Emord & Associates was updating NutraIngredients-USA following an announcement from the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) USA in January that it was preparing a petition.

However, there was no guarantee that this would ultimately be filed, while it was also too early to say which diseases (eg. certain cancers?) might be the focus of the submission, stressed Emord, who is assisting the ANH-USA.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 19, 2011

How Can Nutrition Aid Diabetes Management?

By Nathan Gray

Diabetes affects more than 220 million people globally and the consequences of high blood sugar kill 3.4 million every year. In the second part of their special series on diabetes, NutraIngredients looks at the role of nutrition and diet in managing, and potentially reversing diabetes.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 18, 2011

Antioxidants May Slash Risk of Hearing Loss

By Stephen Daniells

Increased intakes of antioxidant vitamins A and E may significantly reduce the risk of hearing loss, according to a new study from Australia.

People with the highest average intakes of vitamin A had a 47 percent reduced risk of moderate or greater hearing loss, compared to people with the lowest average intakes, scientists from the University of Sydney report in The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging.

In addition, increasing dietary vitamin E intakes were linked with a 14 percent reduction in hearing loss.
The researchers, led by Professor Paul Mitchell, note that reactive oxygen species may damage the inner portion of the ear associated with hearing, and therefore there is a hypothesis that antioxidants may counter this damage and reduce age-related hearing loss.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 16, 2011

What Does Burzynski Documentary Reveal About FDA Agenda

by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger
Editor of NaturalNews.com

(NaturalNews) As I've written about many times before, the cancer industry with all of its research, campaigns, and fundraising activities is really nothing more than a giant, corrupt business venture. As crazy as it might sound to some, the point of the cancer industry is not really to cure cancer -- it is to keep raising money for the alleged, and never-ending, "search for the cure." And the hard-hitting documentary Burzynski The Movie - Cancer Is Serious Business exposes all this as director Eric Merola tracks the 14-year battle of Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski -- the man responsible for creating the all-natural, non-toxic cancer cure featured in the film -- to protect his unique protocol from being stolen by the government and Big Pharma, and to defend his freedom to treat cancer patients with unconventional methods.

 

July 15, 2011

Train Right For Type 2 Diabetes

Everyone knows that exercise is a must for keeping diabetic blood sugars under wraps. However, a new study published in the Journal of Sports Sciences has found that intense interval training outperforms steady-state cardio in terms of blood sugar management.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 14, 2011

Intensive-dose Statin Therapy =Iincreased Diabetes Risk?

NewsRx.com

An analysis of data from previously published studies indicates that intensive-dose statin therapy is associated with an increased risk of new-onset diabetes compared with moderate-dose therapy, according to a study in JAMA.

Compared with placebo, statin therapy significantly reduces cardiovascular events among individuals with and without a history of diabetes mellitus. Recently, findings of several trials comparing intensive- to moderate-dose statin therapy suggested an excess risk of new diabetes among those treated with intensive statin regimens, according to background information in the article. According to the authors, "Given the cardiovascular benefits of statins and the likely increasing use of intensive statin regimens, it is important to quantify any potential long-term risks to enable physicians and patients to make informed choices."

Read more about the study here.

 

July 12, 2011

Review Finds Improved Survival In Trials Of Vitamin D3

A lengthy review published in The Cochrane Library reveals that supplementing older individuals with vitamin D3 is associated with reduced mortality over a two year average period.

Goran Bjelakovic of the University of Nis in Serbia and his European associates selected 50 randomized trials involving vitamin D supplementation, which provided a total of 94,148 participants for their analysis. Most of the trials analyzed the effect of supplementation on bone mineral density, falls and fractures. The subjects' average age was 74, and 79 percent were female. The median length of supplementation with vitamin D was two years.

Read more about the review here.

 

July 11, 2011

Positive Emotions May Buffer Stress, Aging

United Press International

An optimistic outlook has been shown to combat stress -- a known risk factor for heart disease and other illnesses, U.S. researchers say.

Anthony Ong of Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., conducted a review of researchers to determine if it is really true that feeling good may be good for health.

"We all age. It is how we age, however, that determines the quality of our lives," Ong says in a statement.

The review, published in the Current Directions in Psychological Science, suggests positive emotions may be a powerful antidote to stress, pain and illness.

Read more about the review here.

 

July 9, 2011

Low Vitamin D Levels Could Help Explain High Blood Pressure

An article published online in the Journal of General Internal Medicine provides one explanation for the greater incidence of hypertension that occurs among African Americans in comparison with Americans of European descent.

Ken Fiscella, MD of the University of Rochester Medical Center and colleagues compared data from 5,156 Caucasian and 1,984 adult African American participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2006. Blood pressure was measured upon enrollment and serum samples were analyzed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

Read more about the research here.

 

July 8, 2011

Poor Choices, Not Aging, Pack On Pounds

Nanci Hellmich, USA TODAY
USA TODAY

Adults gain an average of almost a pound a year as they age, and much of that weight gain is caused by changes in diet such as extra servings of foods like potato chips, french fries, sugar-sweetened drinks, white bread and low-fiber breakfast cereals, says the largest, most comprehensive study of diet and weight gain in adults.

Other contributors: decreased intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and other minimally processed foods; less physical activity; more time spent watching TV; and poor sleep habits.

The study provides the strongest evidence yet that weight gain is caused primarily by dietary and lifestyle choices, says senior author Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 8, 2011

Radiation Exposure

Drs. Kay Judge and Maxine Barish-Wreden
The Sacramento Bee, Calif.

Radiation exposure has been in the news lately with the recent events in Japan, making the public more aware of possible radiation hazards from other sources. A study published recently in the Archives of Internal Medicine included some interesting news about chest X-rays. People with pneumonia who are younger than 50 and don't smoke don't necessarily need chest X-rays.

Most medical diagnostic guidelines recommend an X-ray for all patients with pneumonia. This is because a mass (cancer) in the lungs can theoretically obstruct the lungs and cause pneumonia. But a study published in April suggests that these guidelines may be too broad.

Read more about the study here.

 

July 7, 2011

Myths About Heart Disease

By Anita Manning
USA TODAY

Imagine hearing news of a catastrophe causing the deaths of 2,200 Americans every day -- an average of one every 39 seconds.

A plague? Nuclear fallout?

It's heart disease, which includes diseases of the heart and circulatory system. The No. 1 killer stalking the world, cardiovascular diseases cause more deaths than all forms of cancer combined.

It's an equal-opportunity destroyer, although it does have a preference for people of color and those over 65. But no age, race or economic class is immune.

"There's a lack of awareness of what ideal cardiovascular health really is," says Ralph Sacco, president of the American Heart Association. While 35% of people surveyed say they're in good health, when quizzed about seven major health factors -- diet, activity level, blood pressure, cholesterol, weight, blood sugar and smoking status -- only about half of 1% hit all the targets for good health, he says. "People think they're healthier than they are," he says, making it less likely that they'll take steps to reduce their heart risks.

Read about 10 myths of heart disease here.

 

July 7, 2011

Eat More Fiber, Live Longer

NewsRx.com

People who consume a fiber rich diet live longer, according to a recent study - the first ever to link longevity and dietary fiber consumption.

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute and the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) examined dietary fiber intake in relation to total mortality and death from specific causes and found that those with the highest fiber intake, specifically fiber from whole grains, had a significantly lower risk of death from any cause for both men and women.

The massive 10-year government study of roughly 388,000 people, published (June 14, 2011) in the Archives of Internal Medicine, "makes the strongest case yet for eating a fiber-rich diet," said Tanya Zuckerbrot, MS, RD, author of the bestselling weight loss book, The F-Factor Diet (Putnam, 2006). She sees fiber as paramount for any patient, whether they have heart disease, diabetes or need to lose weight.

Read more about the report here.

 

July 7, 2011

Being Overweight Could Be Making You Forgetful

By Mary Brophy Marcus
USA TODAY

Older people who have larger waistlines, high blood pressure and other risk factors associated with a condition doctors call "metabolic syndrome" may be at higher risk of memory problems, a new study suggests.

In the large French study, older adults with metabolic syndrome were 20% more likely to have cognitive decline on a memory test than those without it.

"Our study sheds new light on how metabolic syndrome and the individual factors of the disease may affect cognitive health," study author Christelle Raffaitin of the French National Institute of Health Research in Bordeaux said in a press statement. "Our results suggest that management of metabolic syndrome may help slow down age-related memory loss, or delay the onset of dementia."

Read more about the research here.

 

July 6, 2011

Arthritis Pain Relief With the Brain's and Body's Own Powers

By JANE E. ALLEN, ABC News Medical Unit

An optical illusion that harnesses the power of suggestion might one day deliver drug-free pain relief to arthritis sufferers, British researchers say.

Analgesic and anti-inflammatory pills and physical therapy are among traditional approaches to reducing or eliminating the aches and pains of chronic osteoarthritis, common among men and women older than 50. In recent years, many sufferers have tried complementary and alternative approaches such as yoga, massage and acupuncture to counter the pain and stiffness of the wear and tear on their joints.

Now, psychologists at the University of Nottingham say that they might have serendipitously stumbled upon a new, non-invasive way of turning down the pain dial by tapping into brain-body connections.

Read more about the research here.

 

July 6, 2011

Researchers Believe Plants May Help Prevent Cancer

Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News

University of Minnesota Hormel Institute researchers believe plant-based food could be used as an effective intervention therapy for cancer prevention, especially for those at high risk of developing the disease.

The findings -- a summary of recent discoveries in the field of dietary phytochemicals (how plants safe for human consumption interact with the body) -- are published in Nature Reviews Cancer.

The Hormel Institute is engaged in research to understand how these foods chemicals behave inside the body and how they may be used to fight cancer.

Read more about the research here.

 

July 5, 2011

Effectiveness For Zinc Supplements Against Common Cold

The results of a meta-analysis published this year in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews reveal that supplementing with the mineral zinc reduces the severity of common cold symptoms as well as the length of colds. The current analysis updates a previous review, by including several new trials.

Meenu Singh and Rashmi R. Das of the Department of Pediatrics at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research in Chandigarh, India reviewed 13 randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials that evaluated five or more days of zinc supplementation as a treatment for cold in a total of 966 participants, and two trials that tested zinc supplements as a cold preventive for at least five months among 394 participants. They concluded that zinc syrup, lozenges or tablets initiated within one day of cold symptom onset decreased the severity and length of the common cold. Additionally, a greater number of subjects were free of symptoms after one week of zinc treatment compared to subjects that received a placebo. As a preventive, five months of treatment with zinc syrup or lozenges in children resulted in 36 percent fewer colds and less time lost from school compared to those who did not use zinc.

Zinc has been shown to inhibit the rhinovirus that is primarily responsible for colds. The review's findings are significant in light of the number of people affected by colds each year and the potential for the development of complications such as ear infections, sinusitis and bronchitis.

Read more about the review here.

 

July 5, 2011

Diet Plus Exercise Better for Weight Loss Than Either Alone

PRNewswire

Everyone knows that eating a low-fat, low-calorie diet and getting regular exercise helps shed pounds, but a new study led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has found that when it comes to losing weight and body fat, diet and exercise are most effective when done together as compared to either strategy alone.

The results of this randomized trial, led by Anne McTiernan, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Prevention Center and a member of the Hutchinson Center's Public Health Sciences Division, were published online in Obesity.

The majority of women in the study who both improved their diet and exercised regularly shed an average of nearly 11 percent of their starting weight, which exceeded the study's goal of a 10 percent or more reduction in body weight.

"We were surprised at how successful the women were," McTiernan said. "Even though this degree of weight loss may not bring an obese individual to a normal weight, losing even this modest amount of weight can bring health benefits such as a reduced risk of diabetes, heart disease and cancer."

Read more about the study here.

 

July 2, 2011

Tomatoes May Help Ward Off Heart Disease

A University of Adelaide study has shown that tomatoes may be an effective alternative to medication in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, thus preventing cardiovascular disease.

A paper published by Dr Karin Ried in the international journal Maturitas reveals clinical evidence that a bright red pigment called lycopene found in tomatoes and to a lesser extent in watermelon, guava, papaya, pink grapefruit and rosehip has antioxidant properties that are vital to good health.

Dr Ried and her colleague Dr Peter Fakler from the Discipline of General Practice are the first to summarise the effect of lycopene on cholesterol and blood pressure, analysing the collective results of 14 studies in the last 55 years.

"Our study suggests that if more than 25 milligrams of lycopene is taken daily, it can reduce LDL-cholesterol by up to 10%," Dr Ried says.

Learn more about the study here.

 

July 1, 2011

Diabetes Makes You Older Before Your Time

United Press International

People in their 50s with diabetes may age before their time compared with their diabetes-free counterparts, U.S. researchers say.

Dr. Christine Cigolle, an assistant professor of family medicine and internal medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School, says adults ages 51-70 with diabetes developed age-related ailments such as cognitive impairment, incontinence, falls, dizziness, vision impairment and pain at a faster rate than those without diabetes.

Read more here.
 
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